Climate, Science, & Environment

Climate, Science, & Environment

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U.S. declares first Western reservoir water shortage, triggering cuts
U.S. declares first Western reservoir water shortage, triggering cuts
U.S. officials for the first time on Monday declared an official water shortage for the massive Lake Mead reservoir, triggering supply cuts to parts of the drought-stricken Southwest, as 10 Western governors appealed for federal drought disaster aid.
·reuters.com·
U.S. declares first Western reservoir water shortage, triggering cuts
Cats prefer to get free meals rather than work for them
Cats prefer to get free meals rather than work for them
When given the choice between a free meal and performing a task for a meal, cats would prefer the meal that doesn't require much effort. While that might not come as a surprise to some cat lovers, it does to cat behaviorists. Most animals prefer to work for their food—a behavior called contrafreeloading.
·phys.org·
Cats prefer to get free meals rather than work for them
Racist Zoning Practices So Common, You Can 'See It in the Flood Data’
Racist Zoning Practices So Common, You Can 'See It in the Flood Data’
Flooding is becoming worse due to the climate crisis. But the risk doesn’t affect us all equally. A report released by the real estate brokerage firm Redfin this week shows that formerly redlined areas are more vulnerable to the threat of floods.
·gizmodo.com·
Racist Zoning Practices So Common, You Can 'See It in the Flood Data’
MetaArXiv Preprints | Initial Evidence of Research Quality of Registered Reports Compared to the Traditional Publishing Model
MetaArXiv Preprints | Initial Evidence of Research Quality of Registered Reports Compared to the Traditional Publishing Model
In Registered Reports (RRs), initial peer review and in-principle acceptance occurs before knowing the research outcomes. This combats publication bias and distinguishes planned and unplanned research. How RRs could improve the credibility of research findings is straightforward, but there is little empirical evidence. Also, there could be unintended costs such as reducing novelty. 353 researchers peer reviewed a pair of papers from 29 published RRs from psychology and neuroscience and 57 non-RR comparison papers. RRs outperformed comparison papers on all 19 criteria (mean difference=0.46; Scale range -4 to +4) with effects ranging from little improvement in novelty (0.13, 95% credible interval [-0.24, 0.49]) and creativity (0.22, [-0.14, 0.58]) to larger improvements in rigor of methodology (0.99, [0.62, 1.35]) and analysis (0.97, [0.60, 1.34]) and overall paper quality (0.66, [0.30, 1.02]). RRs could improve research quality while reducing publication bias and ultimately improve the credibility of the published literature.
·osf.io·
MetaArXiv Preprints | Initial Evidence of Research Quality of Registered Reports Compared to the Traditional Publishing Model
Projected changes in persistent extreme summer weather events: The role of quasi-resonant amplification
Projected changes in persistent extreme summer weather events: The role of quasi-resonant amplification
Persistent episodes of extreme weather in the Northern Hemisphere summer have been associated with high-amplitude quasi-stationary atmospheric Rossby waves, with zonal wave numbers 6 to 8 resulting from the phenomenon of quasi-resonant amplification (QRA). A fingerprint for the occurrence of QRA can be defined in terms of the zonally averaged surface temperature field. Examining state-of-the-art [Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5)] climate model projections, we find that QRA events are likely to increase by ~50% this century under business-as-usual carbon emissions, but there is considerable variation among climate models. Some predict a near tripling of QRA events by the end of the century, while others predict a potential decrease. Models with amplified Arctic warming yield the most pronounced increase in QRA events. The projections are strongly dependent on assumptions regarding the nature of changes in radiative forcing associated with anthropogenic aerosols over the next century. One implication of our findings is that a reduction in midlatitude aerosol loading could actually lead to Arctic de-amplification this century, ameliorating potential increases in persistent extreme weather events.
·advances.sciencemag.org·
Projected changes in persistent extreme summer weather events: The role of quasi-resonant amplification