Food Treatment

Food Treatment

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In situ quantification of chlorine dioxide gas consumption by fresh produce using UV–visible spectroscopy
In situ quantification of chlorine dioxide gas consumption by fresh produce using UV–visible spectroscopy
"strawberries consume ClO2 gas rapidly and that longer exposure times (17 and 84 min) for continuous exposure resulted in around 45% ClO2 absorption whereas shorter exposure times (7 min) consumed less than 20% of the injected ClO2 because the latter did not reach steady state ClO2 consumption prior to completion."
·sciencedirect.com·
In situ quantification of chlorine dioxide gas consumption by fresh produce using UV–visible spectroscopy
New Approach for Decontaminating and Improving the Quality of Fresh and Fresh-Cut Produce Utilizing Packaging Design and Chlorine Dioxide - MICHIGAN STATE UNIV
New Approach for Decontaminating and Improving the Quality of Fresh and Fresh-Cut Produce Utilizing Packaging Design and Chlorine Dioxide - MICHIGAN STATE UNIV
"we will study chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas as an antimicrobial treatment for leafy greens (lettuce and spinach) and cherry tomatoes for use with current production lines and packaging systems. To inactivate human pathogens with ClO2, the product must be exposed for a prolonged time, and so we will use packaging strategies to address this problem."
·reeis.usda.gov·
New Approach for Decontaminating and Improving the Quality of Fresh and Fresh-Cut Produce Utilizing Packaging Design and Chlorine Dioxide - MICHIGAN STATE UNIV
Inactivation of Salmonella Typhimurium on red chili peppers by treatment with gaseous chlorine dioxide followed by drying - PubMed
Inactivation of Salmonella Typhimurium on red chili peppers by treatment with gaseous chlorine dioxide followed by drying - PubMed
Chili pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) powder and other powdered spices containing chili peppers are occasionally contaminated with foodborne pathogens. We applied chlorine dioxide (ClOsub2/sub) gas treatment to chili peppers prior to drying to inactivate Salmonella Typhimurium. Chili peppers inocula …
·pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov·
Inactivation of Salmonella Typhimurium on red chili peppers by treatment with gaseous chlorine dioxide followed by drying - PubMed
Feasibility and efficacy of using gaseous chlorine dioxide generated by sodium chlorite-acid reaction for decontamination of foodborne pathogens on produce | Semantic Scholar
Feasibility and efficacy of using gaseous chlorine dioxide generated by sodium chlorite-acid reaction for decontamination of foodborne pathogens on produce | Semantic Scholar
Semantic Scholar extracted view of "Feasibility and efficacy of using gaseous chlorine dioxide generated by sodium chlorite-acid reaction for decontamination of foodborne pathogens on produce" by Hui-Erh Chai et al.
·semanticscholar.org·
Feasibility and efficacy of using gaseous chlorine dioxide generated by sodium chlorite-acid reaction for decontamination of foodborne pathogens on produce | Semantic Scholar
Efficacy of gaseous chlorine dioxide for decontamination of Salmonella, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, and Listeria monocytogenes on almonds and peppercorns | Semantic Scholar
Efficacy of gaseous chlorine dioxide for decontamination of Salmonella, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, and Listeria monocytogenes on almonds and peppercorns | Semantic Scholar
Semantic Scholar extracted view of "Efficacy of gaseous chlorine dioxide for decontamination of Salmonella, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, and Listeria monocytogenes on almonds and peppercorns" by Hui-Erh Chai et al.
·semanticscholar.org·
Efficacy of gaseous chlorine dioxide for decontamination of Salmonella, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, and Listeria monocytogenes on almonds and peppercorns | Semantic Scholar
In Situ Generation of Chlorine Dioxide for Decontamination of Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes, and Pathogenic Escherichia coli on Cantaloupes, Mung Beans, and Alfalfa Seeds | Journal of Food Protection
In Situ Generation of Chlorine Dioxide for Decontamination of Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes, and Pathogenic Escherichia coli on Cantaloupes, Mung Beans, and Alfalfa Seeds | Journal of Food Protection
ABSTRACT. In situ generation of chlorine dioxide to reduce microbial populations on produce surfaces has been shown to be effective on produce models. This study examined the treatment for decontamination of bacterial pathogens on whole cantaloupes and sprout seeds. Whole cantaloupes, mung beans, and alfalfa seeds were inoculated with Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes, and Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli, sprayed with or dipped in 0.4 to 1.6% sodium chlorite (NaClO2) solutions, dried, and treated with 6 mM hydrochloric acid (HCl; sequential treatment). Controls were samples treated with NaClO2 or HCl (individual treatment). The pathogen populations on samples before and after treatments were enumerated to determine the reductions of pathogen populations by the treatments. The methods of applying NaClO2 and HCl (dipping for 30 min or spraying 0.2 g on cantaloupe rind [2 by 2 cm]), NaClO2 concentrations of 0.4 to 1.6% for cantaloupes, and treatment times of 5, 15, and 30 min for sprout seeds were evaluated to identify treatment parameters. For cantaloupes treated with spraying with 1.6% NaClO2, the sequential treatment caused significantly (P 0.05) higher reductions (6.2 to 7.7 log CFU/cm2) than the combined reductions (3.2 to 5.2 log CFU/cm2) by the individual treatments. For cantaloupes treated by dipping in 1.6% NaClO2 and by spraying with 0.4 and 0.8% NaClO2, the reductions caused by the sequential treatment were not significantly (P 0.05) different from those by the individual treatments. For mung beans, sequential 15- and 30-min treatments caused significantly (P 0.05) higher reductions of 4.3 to 5.0 and 4.7 to 6.7 log CFU/g, respectively, than the individual treatments. The sequential 15-min treatment also caused high reductions of 5.1 to 7.3 log CFU/g on alfalfa seeds. The treatments did not bleach the color of cantaloupes and did not affect the germination rates of mung beans and alfalfa seeds. This study identified 1.6% NaClO2 and 6 mM HCl for sequential spraying treatment for cantaloupes and for sequential dipping (15-min) treatment for mung beans and alfalfa seeds that may be used for decontamination of whole cantaloupes and sprout seeds.HIGHLIGHTSSequential application of NaClO2 and HCl for surface decontamination was examined.Treatment parameters were identified for cantaloupe, mungs bean, and alfalfa seed.The effective concentrations were 1.6% NaClO2 and 6 mM HCl.The method of applying the chemicals was sequential spraying for cantaloupe.The application was sequential dipping for 15 min for mung bean and alfalfa seed.
·meridian.allenpress.com·
In Situ Generation of Chlorine Dioxide for Decontamination of Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes, and Pathogenic Escherichia coli on Cantaloupes, Mung Beans, and Alfalfa Seeds | Journal of Food Protection
The Effect of Controlled-release Chlorine Dioxide on the Preservation of Grapefruit
The Effect of Controlled-release Chlorine Dioxide on the Preservation of Grapefruit
The effect of controlled-release chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas on the safety and quality of grapefruit was studied. The experiments were run under controlled chamber systems with inoculated fruit, and in boxed fruit under commercial conditions. For the inoculation test, fruit artificially inoculated with either Escherichia coli or Penicillium digitatum, or naturally inoculated Xanthomonas citri ssp. citri (Xcc) (fruits with citrus canker lesions), were incubated in a chamber containing a dose equivalent to 0–60 mg·L−1 of pure ClO2 as an antimicrobial agent. After 24 hours, the microbial population on treated grapefruit was significantly reduced compared with that of control fruit: a dosage of 5 mg·L−1 completely inhibit the growth of E. coli and P. digitatum, but a dosage of 60 mg·L−1 was needed to completely kill Xcc. For the simulated commercial experiment, fruit were harvested in late Oct. 2015 passed through a commercial packing line, and packed in 29 L citrus boxes. ClO2 packets were attached to the top lids with the following five treatments: fast-release, slow-release, slow/fast-release combination (each containing 14.5 mg·L−1 of pure ClO2), double dose fast-release (containing 29 mg·L−1 of ClO2), and control. After 6 weeks of storage at 10 °C (to simulate storage and transportation) + 1 week of storage at 20 °C (to simulate retail marketing), the fruit quality was evaluated. The slow-release treatment at standard dose exhibited the best antimicrobial activity, reducing total aerobic bacterial count and yeast/mold count by 0.95 and 0.94 log colony-forming units (cfu)/g of fruit, respectively, and maintained the best visual, sensory, and overall quality. However, the higher dosage treatments resulted in phytotoxicity as evidenced by peel browning.
·journals.ashs.org·
The Effect of Controlled-release Chlorine Dioxide on the Preservation of Grapefruit