Všeobecné zrcadlo digitální Asie

Všeobecné zrcadlo digitální Asie

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Franziska Oertle
Franziska Oertle
Known affectionately as the "one who cracked the code". She's helped countless students start from zero to mastering the language. Author of a four-volume colloquial Tibetan language textbook, Franziska truly understands the elegance of the Tibetan language and generously offers everything she knows of the language to her students. Few people can make a difficult subject easy and Franziska through both her great love of the language and of teaching, makes learning Tibetan not only fun but relatively easy. Franziska is the Tibetan language teacher at SINI and has helped countless students go from zero to hero. She has taught at the University of Virginia, the FPMT Translation Program, Emory University, SIT in Nepal, the Rangjung Yeshe Institute, and has been invited to many institutions to share her ideas and views on learning Tibetan. She has opened the door to the Tibetan language for so many students from all over the world. Her commitment to preserving the Tibetan language is deeply inspiring. If you are interested in learning Tibetan, consider taking her class.
·franziska.in·
Franziska Oertle
China Historical Christian Database
China Historical Christian Database
The China Historical Christian Database (CHCD) quantifies and visualizes the place of Christianity in modern China (1550-1950). It provides users the tools to discover where every Christian church, school, hospital, orphanage, publishing house, and the like were located in China, and it documents who worked inside those buildings, both foreign and Chinese. Collectively, this information creates spatial maps and generates relational networks that reveal where, when, and how Western ideas, technologies, and practices entered China. Simultaneously, it uncovers how and through whom Chinese ideas, technologies, and practices were conveyed to the West. This project breaks new ground in providing quantifiable data about modern Sino-Western relations. Its intuitive interface generates visualizations, lists, and maps for use by the general public, students and teachers in secondary education and colleges, in the US and globally, with English and Chinese navigation. Advanced DH users have open access to its data for elaboration. BU’s digital infrastructure guarantees long-term sustainability, and CHCD’s international collaborations in the USA, Asia, and Europe help promote historical understanding between China and the rest of the world. The CHCD is hosted by the Center for Global Christianity and Mission at Boston University.
·chcdatabase.com·
China Historical Christian Database
Chinese Religious Text Authority
Chinese Religious Text Authority
The Chinese Religious Text Authority aims to connect bibliographic information across collections, archives, and private libraries in order to map out detailed webs of relationships among producers, publishers, and distributors of religious texts. In this first phase of the project, we focus on a corpus of pre-1949 Chinese Religious texts included in major reprint collections. The data generated from this open-access, international, collaborative project has the potential to reveal formerly undiscovered associations. CRTA was founded in December 2018. We are grateful to Simon Wiles for help with the technical infrastructure and hosting the wiki. CRTA has received and is grateful for support from FROGBEAR, and the University of Colorado.
·crta.info·
Chinese Religious Text Authority
The Kumarajiva Project | Khyentse Foundation
The Kumarajiva Project | Khyentse Foundation
Khyentse Foundation is pleased to announce the official launch of the Kumarajiva Project (note: website is currently only in Chinese). KF’s latest translation effort focuses primarily on translating into Chinese all the texts in the Tibetan Buddhist canon that are not currently available in the Chinese canon. After a successful pilot project and several years of extensive research and planning, the Kumarajiva Project is now prepared to dive into the immense task of translating more than 130,000 pages of Tibetan texts into Chinese.  Watch Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche introduce the project. The Kumarajiva Project is known in Chinese as 圓滿法藏-佛典漢譯計畫, the transliteration of which is “Yu’an Man Fa-Zang.” The Chinese name translates roughly to “enriching the treasury of the dharma” or “making the treasury more perfect than it already is.” The “treasury” refers to the Chinese Buddhist canons. Also, there are numerous texts from other Buddhist canons that are not available in Chinese. The vision of the Kumarajiva Project is to make all Buddhist texts available in Chinese, starting by translating the texts that are available in Tibetan but not in Chinese.
·khyentsefoundation.org·
The Kumarajiva Project | Khyentse Foundation
Tibetan Oral History Archive Project | Library of Congress
Tibetan Oral History Archive Project | Library of Congress
The Tibetan Oral History and Archive Project (TOHAP) is a digital online web archive of oral history interviews in Tibetan and Chinese with accompanying written transcripts (in English) that documents the social and political history of modern Tibet. The interview tapes can be listened to simultaneous with reading the transcripts. The translations were made in a literal style to retain a flavor of the original Tibetan. The TOHAP collection includes a large corpus of interviews from common folks and Drepung monastery monks speaking about their lives, and Tibetan and Chinese officials speaking about modern Tibetan history. An interactive glossary is available to explain Tibetan terms that appear in the transcripts. As of April 2019, the portion of the TOHAP Collection that is available on line consists of 403 tapes (361 from the Political/History collection, 35 from the common folk collection and 7 from the Drepung collection). These come from interviews with 125 interviewees. This comprises on line approximately 500 hours of recordings and about 11,000 pages of transcripts. Future installments will add the small remainder of the Political collection and more tapes and transcripts from the Common Folk and Drepung Collections over the next few years. These interviews were collected by Professor Melvyn C. Goldstein and his assistants/colleagues during a series of research projects on modern Tibet history and society that were funded by the National Geographic Society (1980-81), National Endowment for the Humanities (RO-20261-82, RO-20886-85, RO-21860-89, RO-22251-91, RO-22754-94) and during a large Tibetan Oral History Project funded by the Henry Luce Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities (RZ-20585-00, RZ-50326-05, RZ-50845-08). Professor Goldstein is the John Reynolds Harkness Professor of Anthropology and Co-Director of the Center for Research on Tibet at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Knowledge of the social and political history of Tibet during the second half of the Twentieth Century has been limited by the absence of the voices of everyday Tibetans and officials from the traditional Tibetan government. The Tibetan Oral History and Archive Project was undertaken by Professor Goldstein to collect and preserve these voices and with it a record of the diversity of life as it was lived in Tibet in the traditional and socialist eras. The ensuing Oral History Archive consists of interviews with almost 700 Tibetans (and a few Chinese) living in the Tibet Autonomous Region of China and in exile in India and the West about their lives and modern history. This archive, the largest of its type in the world, contains three collections: the Common Folk Oral History collection, the Political or Historical Collection and the Drepung Monastery Collection.  The Common Folk Collection consists of recorded interviews in Tibet and India with over 600 Tibetans from all strata about their lives during the traditional society and the socialist period through the Cultural Revolution. Its files begin with the code: OR… The Political Collection consists of recorded interviews with former Tibetan government officials who played important roles in Tibet's history. The topics discussed include historical events in both the traditional and socialist periods. Its files begin with the code: H… The Drepung Monastery Collection consists of recorded interviews on monastic social and economic life with roughly 100 monks who were members of Drepung monastery in the traditional era. Drepung monastery is located 5 miles outside of Lhasa and was Tibet's largest monastery, housing about 10,000 monks in 1959 at the end of the traditional era. Its files begin with the code:  M…
·loc.gov·
Tibetan Oral History Archive Project | Library of Congress
Chinatownology
Chinatownology
Chinatownology is dedicated to the history, heritage and culture of Singapore Chinatown and Chinatowns around the world. In this website, you can find articles on the history, culture and events in Singapore Chinatown, and Chinatowns around the world. We use Chinatowns as a platform to explore and to understand the development of overseas Chinese 华侨 societies, its food culture and material culture. You can find things to do, places to eat and shop. These establishments may or may not be in Chinatown but are related to the cultural development of overseas Chinese. A visit to any Chinatown is always visually exciting and interesting. But to connect yourself to the spirit of the Chinatown and its historical memories, you need to know its history and embrace its shared memories. Chinatownology is a work-in-progress website. Chinatowns have a long history and means different things to different people. Full documentation of Chinatowns is a never ending process. That is why we decide to develop this website as a work-in-progress project.
·chinatownology.com·
Chinatownology
The Meridian Trust: A Tibetan Buddhist Film Resource
The Meridian Trust: A Tibetan Buddhist Film Resource
Welcome to The Meridian Trust. Browse our content. We offer quality teachings, retreats dialogues and workshops from all Tibetan Buddhist traditions. Shared for free, for all who wish to follow the path. The Meridian Trust creates, curates and shares an extensive collection of Tibetan Buddhist film resources. Our aim is to be a channel, a line, through which Tibetan Buddhist wisdom can flow. Founded in 1985, we hold and share a wealth of material – from the transmissions and teachings of the great Venerable Masters of Tibet, from the late 1970s to the present, with hundreds of hours of teachings, retreats, workshops and talks by those at the forefront of Tibetan Buddhism today. Our resources are available cost-free, in line with Buddhist tradition. We aim to bring this Tibetan Buddhist wisdom to a wider audience, via our new website and translation work. We want to be a hub, through which knowledge flows, across schools. Via partnerships, we wish to bring the message of clear Buddhist thought and action to a new audience who, in these complex times, are seeking tools and views that may help them to live more meaningful and more contented lives.
·meridian-trust.org·
The Meridian Trust: A Tibetan Buddhist Film Resource
Mirinae Explorer
Mirinae Explorer
Explorer is a new kind of study aid that will analyze any Korean sentence you give it, identifying and explaining all the parts-of-speech, particles, conjugations and grammar patterns, show the phrase-structure of the sentence and give individual word-meanings as well as a whole-sentence translation.
sifonkubik·mirinae.io·
Mirinae Explorer
Himalaya Archive Vienna
Himalaya Archive Vienna
The HAV is a modern multimedia archive at the Center for Inter­disciplinary Research and Documentation of Inner and South Asian Cultural History (CIRDIS), University of Vienna, and home to research documentation from South and Inner Asia with a special focus on the Himalaya. Its over-arching archive structure houses multi-disciplinary data originating from largely third-party funded research projects as well as private collections or donations. It aims to provide a strong foundation for the successful collaboration between research partners from various disciplines united by a common interest and wish to preserve and share their data according to the policies of the open science community. The HAV is under active development. This first release is a glimpse into the thematic and geographical width and depth of the material currently being archived and a series of advanced representational features planned to be integrated later on. At the time of writing a number of further collections are already being evaluated and/or prepared for ingestion. Further information about us, our ongoing research initiatives and related news can be found on the website of CIRDIS.
·hav.univie.ac.at·
Himalaya Archive Vienna
Jan Palach
Jan Palach
These web pages present the life story of Jan Palach, a student of the Faculty of Arts, Charles University in Prague who set himself on fire in Wenceslas Square on 16 January 1969. By this shocking act, he wanted to arouse the Czech public from lethargy following the August invasion of Czechoslovakia. Palach’s protest caused extraordinary reaction both in the Czech Republic and abroad. To this day, Jan Palach’s name is known worldwide. The above-mentioned events are introduced on these web pages in different ways. The pages contain historical texts, period photos, and archival documents. You may also familiarize yourself with Palach’s legacy through film, television and radio documentaries. The website is available in Tibetan language as well (among others).
·janpalach.cz·
Jan Palach
Studies in Nepali History and Society | Martin Chautari
Studies in Nepali History and Society | Martin Chautari
Studies in Nepali History and Society (SINHAS) is a peer-reviewed semi-annual publication of Martin Chautari (Kathmandu DAO Registration No. 289/059/060). SINHAS was founded in 1996 and is published by Mandala Book Point, Kathmandu, Nepal, in June and December. SINHAS provides an interdisciplinary forum for original research. The journal aims to further understanding of cultural politics and social conditions in Nepal through a commitment to historical analysis, attention to Nepali scholarship, and a willingness to explore new terrains. Detailed studies from any discipline are invited. All papers must have a substantive focus on Nepal, but comparative work is also welcome. In addition to research-based articles, the journal invites submissions in the following areas: Critical reflection on the state of Nepal Studies. Articles may be oriented by topic, period, region or discipline; Commentary: Opinion pieces on current social issues, usually by individuals with first-hand experience of the topic under discussion; Single- and two-book reviews and multi-volume book review essays; and Notes from the archive: Original extracts from public and private archives with additional notes.
·martinchautari.org.np·
Studies in Nepali History and Society | Martin Chautari
Ars Orientalis - Smithsonian's National Museum of Asian Art
Ars Orientalis - Smithsonian's National Museum of Asian Art
Each fall the Freer and Sackler publishes, with the University of Michigan, a journal of the latest research in art of the Middle East and Asia. Titled Ars Orientalis, the journal is a collection of scholarship that crosses academic disciplines and aims to connect researchers, institutions, and ideas using one central theme per volume.
·asia.si.edu·
Ars Orientalis - Smithsonian's National Museum of Asian Art
Modern China Geospatial Database
Modern China Geospatial Database
The Modern China Geospatial Database (MCGD) seeks to provide an all-encompassing series of datasets for the spatial analysis of modern China. The ENP-China project has produced a comprehensive series of vector layers related to the administrative geography of China in the Republican period. These data layers are available on the MCGD repository on ArcGIS Online. On this page, we provide another component of MCGD, namely the gazetteer of all place names in modern China. Our purpose is to identify and collect all the name variants under which locations in China were named in historical sources. In particular, this includes the amazing variety of transliteration systems through which Westerners designated place names (e.g. for Shanghai: Shang-hae, Changhaï, Schanghai, etc.). Of course, the main purpose is to enable users to find and locate any place name on a map thanks to the geo-coordinates attached to each location. The MCGS Search interface can be used to identify and locate place names. User can search place name individually or they can upload a list of place names as a CSV file. The search engine will retrieve any name, in Chinese or any transliteration system, and provide the geo-coordinates, along with the current name in Chinese and pinyin, as well as all known designations. For best results, we recommend to always include both the name of the place and the name of the province as the same place names appear multiple times across China.
·analytics.huma-num.fr·
Modern China Geospatial Database
Tibetan date calculator | npm.io
Tibetan date calculator | npm.io
Check Tibetan-date-calculator 1.2.1 package - Last release 1.2.1 with MIT licence at our NPM packages aggregator and search engine. A Javascript library to calculate Tibetan calendrical dates according to the Phugpa tradition. The calculations are basically implementation the formulas in Svante Janson, "Tibetan Calendar Mathematics". We are using year 806 as the epoch for all calculations. See the paper for details.
·npm.io·
Tibetan date calculator | npm.io
Orient-Digital | State Library of Berlin
Orient-Digital | State Library of Berlin
In the framework of a DFG-funded project, we are currently building a union catalogue and a portal for oriental manuscripts. It will contain the metadata of Arabic, Persian, and Ottoman-Turkish manuscripts from more than 25 cooperating institutions and will provide links to the digitised manuscripts that are available online. The project’s objective is to establish common standards for indexing metadata, to convert print catalogues to online catalogues, and to provide central access to all available electronic data. After the launch of the new portal, the URL www.orient-digital.de will provide access to the collections of numerous other institutions. Project partners are the Bavarian State Library Munich, the Gotha Research Library, the Berlin State Library, and the Leipzig University Computation Centre, which is responsible for developing the database. The Berlin database was "frozen" in January 2021 until the launch of the new portal. Presently available data will remain searchable on this page, while the collections of the project partners in Gotha, Leipzig and Munich can be found at the following links: Gotha Research Library: https://gothams.dl.uni-leipzig.de Leipzig University: https://www.islamic-manuscripts.net https://www.refaiya.uni-leipzig.de Bavarian State Library Munich: https://www.bsb-muenchen.de/sammlungen/orient/ueber-die-sammlung/ Search: https://www.bsb-muenchen.de/sammlungen/orient/recherche/ Database of Oriental Manuscripts at the Berlin State Library The collection, which is curated by the Oriental Department of the Berlin State Library, consists of more than 43,000 volumes (manuscript and block print) in over 140 languages and 70 different scripts from Asia, Africa, and Europe. The size and content of the collection have earned it great international renown. For more information on the oriental manuscripts collection, accessions, events, and publications, please visit the Homepage of the Oriental Department. The database contains the shelf marks of the entire collection of oriental manuscripts. As minimum information, it provides language, script, number of folios, and catalogue number/cataloguing state. Due to the large variation in the provenance of the data (catalogues, registers, accession lists), the datasets may not always be uniform or equally detailed. At present, extensive descriptions in multiple scripts are provided for approximately 11,500 texts in several languages from various regions. Around 7,100 of these offer access to a fully digitised copy of the object. The number of detailed manuscript descriptions and digitised objects is constantly growing. Parts of the collection that are currently electronically accessible include precious Arabic manuscripts, the full collection of illuminated Islamic manuscripts (among which are the famous Diez albums and the Jahangir album), Hebrew manuscripts, Armenian manuscripts, and many others, including collections from Central Asia, South Asia, and South East Asia. The Database of Oriental Manuscripts was developed by the Oriental Department of the Berlin State Library in collaboration with the Leipzig University Computation Centre, which is in charge of engineering and administrating the platform.
·orient-digital.de·
Orient-Digital | State Library of Berlin
Tibetan Medicinal Database | CrossAsia
Tibetan Medicinal Database | CrossAsia
It is the aim of this database to shed light on the plurality of these translations. The database is regularly updated as the data expands. Due to the local biodiversity of certain regions, Tibetan materia medica have a variety of biological identifications. In the case of Tibetan anatomical terms, the situation is equally ambiguous: it is not always clear which anatomical structure is actually meant by a Tibetan anatomical term and, conversely, biomedical anatomical structures are named differently in different contemporary publications in Tibetan language. The database is populated by Tibetan materia medica and their available colloquial English and German correlates (the so-called "trivial names") as well as the more precise Latin biomedical or scientific names according to the sources considered. The database was initiated and continued as part of my previous projects, which identified the medical denotations of the “unfolded tree” metaphors depicted on the medical college at Labrang Monastery (P22965-G21) and on Tibetan anatomical terms (P26129-G21), both funded by the Austrian Science Fund.
·crossasia.org·
Tibetan Medicinal Database | CrossAsia
Databáze českého uměleckého překladu
Databáze českého uměleckého překladu
Není vůbec samozřejmé, že si díla zahraničních spisovatelů můžeme přečíst česky. Autoři z celého světa k nám přicházejí prostřednictvím překladů, díky práci překladatelů. Databáze českých překladů a překladatelů si klade za cíl překladatele, jejich činnost a výsledky zviditelnit. Na těchto stránkách se představuje životopisem a seznamem knižních překladů více než 1000 překladatelských osobností činných po roce 1945. Kromě toho je databáze bibliografií překladů, o jejichž autorech jsou dostupné jen základní informace. Jen tak si lze utvořit celkovou představu o kontextu, v němž jednotliví překladatelé působili a do nějž pomáhali vstoupit zahraničním spisovatelům a jejich tvorbě, ať už nové či v nových překladech. Celkem jsou prozatím k dispozici podrobné informace o téměř 40 000 knižních překladech do češtiny. K databázi je přidruženo několik tisíc dalších položek, které dosud nebyly podrobně zpracovány. K překladatelům a překladům lze přistupovat z mnoha hledisek. V tomto rozhraní je to zohledněno čtyřmi základními kategoriemi v záhlaví stránky – všechny cesty však vedou k témuž cíli, jímž je poznání překladatelů, překladů a kontextu překladu. Navíc je k dispozici plnotextové vyhledávání. Po obsahové stránce databáze navazuje na Databázi českého uměleckého překladu po roce 1945 spravovanou Obcí překladatelů. Doplňuje ji, rozšiřuje a aktualizuje. Oproti databázi Obce překladatelů vyniká tato databáze komplexním vyhledávacím rozhraním, zatím však nezahrnuje jednotky kratší než knihy, tj. např. časopisecké překlady. Mezi další významné zdroje patří databáze Národní knihovny v Praze a řada specifických soupisů překladů. Při sestavování databáze byly použity následující zdroje. Na těchto stránkách se nachází uživatelské rozhraní databáze pro širokou veřejnost. V centrálním katalogu UK je k dispozici také badatelské rozhraní.
·databaze-prekladu.cz·
Databáze českého uměleckého překladu
British Library Research Repository
British Library Research Repository
The British Library has launched a beta-version Shared Research Repository for cultural and heritage organisations, after announcing a pilot project last year. The shared research repository is created in collaboration with our five project partners who are all UK cultural and heritage organisations: the British Museum, Tate, National Museums Scotland (NMS), MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology), and Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. The British Library and its project partners are all Independent Research Organisations, this means we undertake significant research, but research is not our main function; we share the need to make our research more discoverable, and the creation of the Shared Research Repository will transform how this research can be found and used. Our research Our organisations are research active, working with partners both nationally and internationally. Our research informs and supports almost every aspect of our work, be it curation, conservation, preservation, resource discovery, digital innovation or learning. Whether it’s a major exhibition or a new way to discover or understand a unique part of our collections, it has been enabled by staff research. The shared research repository allows open access to research undertaken by the five partners and the British Library, ensuring that research gains exposure, is discoverable, and is used by anyone to support and further their own research. The shared repository allows users to search across the combined content, meaning that common research topics and collaborative activities can be discovered and explored through a single search. Search the Shared Research Repository For example, a researcher exploring written scripts in historic documents may be interested in the digitised indexes of the British Library’s Hebrew manuscripts, the development of Pictish written symbols (NMS) and excavated Roman writing tablets as recorded by MOLA. Similarly, the scientific research on plant species by Kew staff might be complemented by fossil reports from NMS or interpretation of the plants presented in botanical drawings held by Tate or the British Museum. Material such as journal articles, conference papers, books and book chapters, reports, datasets, exhibition texts, images and blog posts all produced by our staff and research associates are now available to explore and download. Where the full item cannot be added, metadata about the research output is provided together with a link to the full item held elsewhere. The repository currently holds just a selection of outputs to give a flavour of our research activities, with many more to be added in the coming months. The British Library's repository The material in the British Library’s own repository relates to research around our printed, digital and heritage collections, our exhibitions, new forms of research, and our major role in library infrastructure activities. For example, our public exhibitions involve many hours of work to prepare, research and interpret collection items for the displays and gallery texts, and these form unique research outputs. Datasets generated through new forms of research include outputs such as XML transcriptions of ancient digitised texts used for training in optical character recognition. And library infrastructural activities include articles and reports written by our colleagues around book conservation, digital preservation and international co-operation. Find out more about collaborative research activities at the British Library, or download our latest annual Research Report. And start exploring the Library's research repository now. Shared repository The Shared Research Repository consists of individual repositories for each partner plus a shared layer offering a single point of access to the combined content. Each partner is responsible for depositing and managing their own content, while the overall repository service is managed the British Library and is currently a beta service. The next few months will see all partners continuing to add more research outputs, and we will assess the impact of making our research discoverable and available for use by researchers everywhere. If all goes well we’ll be looking at how we can extend the service both in the volume of content available, and the number and range of partner organisations including beyond the cultural sector. Do get in touch if you'd like to find out more.
·bl.iro.bl.uk·
British Library Research Repository