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5 Things High-Performing Teams Do Differently
5 Things High-Performing Teams Do Differently
New research suggests that the highest-performing teams have found subtle ways of leveraging social connections during the pandemic to fuel their success. The findings offer important clues on ways any organization can foster greater connectedness — even within a remote or hybrid work setting — to engineer higher-performing teams. Doing so takes more than simply hiring the right people and arming them with the right tools to do their work. It requires creating opportunities for genuine, authentic relationships to develop. The authors present five key characteristics of high-performing teams, all of which highlight the vital role of close connection among colleagues as a driver of team performance.
·hbr.org·
5 Things High-Performing Teams Do Differently
363 : Setting Boundaries in the Coffee Shop w/ Tom Henschel — Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals
363 : Setting Boundaries in the Coffee Shop w/ Tom Henschel — Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals
Working in a coffee bar means working in close quarters with your fellow baristas, managers, and owners. In this daily work we will eventually begin to feel the tension and start to wonder about how we can set boundaries for ourselves so we can…
·keystotheshop.com·
363 : Setting Boundaries in the Coffee Shop w/ Tom Henschel — Keys To The Shop : Equipping Coffee Retail Professionals
The Costs of Being a Perfectionist Manager
The Costs of Being a Perfectionist Manager
Being a perfectionist does not mean that you are doomed as a manager. Organizational research on perfectionism is starting to provide new insights and practical evidence-based steps for managers and their network to breaking free from their perfectionistic compulsions. Fortunately, perfectionists are likely to be goal-focused and action-oriented and these strategies are aimed at helping them recalibrate their expectations.
·hbr.org·
The Costs of Being a Perfectionist Manager
Stop Doing Your Team’s Work for Them
Stop Doing Your Team’s Work for Them
Your primary task as a leader is to build capability below you — but for new managers, this can be especially challenging. You want to be liked. That’s natural. But remember: Placing performance pressure on your team isn’t cruel. A leader who stretches their people risks the possibility of not being liked in order to give others the opportunity to grow. This means the next time you are tempted to solve a problem for your team member, stop yourself. Turn it into a learning opportunity instead. Don’t play the game — keep the score. As a new manager you may feel like a team captain striving to be the best player on the field. But remember: You’re not the captain, you’re the coach. Your job is to set clear expectations, communicate who is accountable for them, and give them the tools they need to succeed. Ask the right questions. When someone comes to you with a problem, ask searching questions. What do you think is at the core of this issue? Have you thought about alternative approaches? What can we sacrifice without detracting from the overall value of the project? Think about your future. Your goal shouldn’t be to make yourself indispensable to your team, it should be to make yourself redundant. Build a team that can function without you, and then go to the next level and build another one. This is what will ultimately set you apart as a leader, not just a doer.
·hbr.org·
Stop Doing Your Team’s Work for Them
How to Navigate Conflict with a Coworker
How to Navigate Conflict with a Coworker
Interpersonal conflicts are common in the workplace, and it’s easy to get caught up in them. But that can lead to reduced creativity, slower and worse decision-making, and even fatal mistakes. So how can we return to our best selves? Having studied conflict management and resolution over the past several years, the author outlines seven principles to help you work more effectively with difficult colleagues: (1) Understand that your perspective is not the only one possible. (2) Be aware of and question any unconscious biases you may be harboring. (3) View the conflict not as me-versus-them but as a problem to be jointly solved. (4) Understand what outcome you’re aiming for. (5) Be very judicious in discussing the issue with others. (6) Experiment with behavior change to find out what will improve the situation. (7) Make sure to stay curious about the other person and how you can more effectively work together.
·hbr.org·
How to Navigate Conflict with a Coworker
#119: The Power of Questions — Lead Your Life
#119: The Power of Questions — Lead Your Life
Given any advice lately? If so, I want you to think about this - when was the last time you asked a powerful question? In today’s episode, I’m diving into one of the most important tools to becoming a better listener and how you can use the…
·overcast.fm·
#119: The Power of Questions — Lead Your Life
Best of MBS
Best of MBS
Michael Bungay Stanier has a rich history of powerful podcasts, including the Great Work Podcast, We Will Get Through This, and 2 Pages with MBS. Find the best episodes in one place here on the Best of MBS.
·pod.link·
Best of MBS
Why to validate someone—even when you don't agree — Commcoterie
Why to validate someone—even when you don't agree — Commcoterie
Validation means that you recognize another person’s thoughts, feelings, or behaviors as understandable. Communicating that recognition is one of the most important parts of active listening. It shows another person that we hear them and provides an invitation for them to elaborate if they choose. S
·commcoterie.com·
Why to validate someone—even when you don't agree — Commcoterie
Dr. Sherry Walling on the mind of entrepreneurs — Above Board
Dr. Sherry Walling on the mind of entrepreneurs — Above Board
Jack and Dr. Sherry Walling dive deep into our minds to discuss burnout, depression, the benefits of neurological diversification, the mental health fallout from Covid, psychedelic assisted therapy, and more for people who work for themselves. They also get into the mindset, values and traits of becoming and sustaining going out on your own as an entrepreneur. Dr. Walling is a clinical psychologist, speaker, podcaster, best-selling author, yoga teacher, and mental health advocate. Her company, ZenFounder, provides mental wellness resources to leaders and entrepreneurs as they navigate transition, loss, conflict, or any manner of complex human experience.
·usefathom.com·
Dr. Sherry Walling on the mind of entrepreneurs — Above Board