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How Can We Create a Manual For Civilization?
How Can We Create a Manual For Civilization?
The promise of a technologically advancing future is predicated on millennia of accumulated knowledge. How can we retain that knowledge?
·longnow.org·
How Can We Create a Manual For Civilization?
Beyond Order Jordan B. Peterson Montreal | Host: Jonathan Pageau
Beyond Order Jordan B. Peterson Montreal | Host: Jonathan Pageau
We had the honor of having our dear friend Jonathan Pageau host this Beyond Order lecture in Montreal on May 23rd, 2022. Jonathan opens the show by describing how he first heard (and subsequently met) Jordan. This event, then, serves as a continuation of the conversations they first had. Throughout this hour-and-a-half-long event, Dr. Peterson and Jonathan Pageau discuss perception, symbolism, values, and the relationship between perception and the cognitive scientist’s attempts to understand consciousness. —Links— Check out Jonathan Pageau’s YouTube channel: https://youtube.com/channel/UCtCTSf3UwRU14nYWr_xm-dQ Websites: https://bit.ly/3O7FnPu (speaking) https://bit.ly/3OhLv7l (carving) https://bit.ly/3tGW4Jn (writing) —Chapters— 0:00 — Intro 4:55 — Dr. Peterson enters the stage 8:00 — Perception, Cognitive Science, and the problem of bodyless AI 11:30 — The visual cliff experiment & perceiving the world 18:30 — The awe of infinity & complexity of the Heavens 21:00 — Awe, imitation, & why humans celebrate 28:00 — The role of sacrifice & delaying gratification 32:00 — Egyptian gods & ancient symbolism 36:00 — Pyramids vs. mountains in The Bible 44:00 — The cost of not aiming properly 52:30 — Bottom-up vs. top-down conceptualizations of the world 57:00 — Sam Harris 1:05:00 — Why the Diversity, Inclusivity, and Equity types are taking on STEM 1:10:00 — Is it possible to create values from scratch? Nietzsche, Freud, & Jung 1:16:00 — Why go to church? 1:22:00 — Q&A #Perception #BeyondOrder #JonathanPageau #Symbolism #Values #SamHarris // SUPPORT THIS CHANNEL // Newsletter: https://bit.ly/3MB4LLP Donations: https://bit.ly/3QcZ4qp // COURSES // Discovering Personality: https://bit.ly/31uQdLU Self Authoring Suite: https://bit.ly/3zw1FFY Understand Myself (personality test): https://bit.ly/3pUETQo // BOOKS // Beyond Order: 12 More Rules for Life: https://bit.ly/3HcZPvi 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos: https://bit.ly/3Hc3nOx Maps of Meaning: The Architecture of Belief: https://bit.ly/3NHrB5H // LINKS // Website: https://bit.ly/3aKe5j8 Events: https://bit.ly/3xcpnnW Blog: https://bit.ly/39eqifL Podcast: https://bit.ly/3Qc7MVO // SOCIAL // Twitter: https://twitter.com/jordanbpeterson Instagram: https://bit.ly/3MySlUx Facebook: https://bit.ly/3aHr4lI Telegram: https://bit.ly/3vZHlYj All socials: https://bit.ly/3OhdTXa
·youtube.com·
Beyond Order Jordan B. Peterson Montreal | Host: Jonathan Pageau
Build a Backyard Observatory on Paper
Build a Backyard Observatory on Paper
Hi, I'm a cat illustrator... This cat is an astronomer assistant... Since I can't afford to build a backyard observatory, I decided at least to realize it on paper...
·reddit.com·
Build a Backyard Observatory on Paper
Mari Samuelsen, Scoring Berlin & Jonathan Stockhammer – Meredi: White Flowers Take Their Bath - YouTube
Mari Samuelsen, Scoring Berlin & Jonathan Stockhammer – Meredi: White Flowers Take Their Bath - YouTube
Mari Samuelsen’s latest Deutsche Grammophon album explores the phenomenon on which so much of life on earth depends. Lys – Norwegian for “Light” – presents music by thirteen female composers, from Hildegard of Bingen to Hildur Guðnadóttir, combining specially commissioned works with new arrangements of existing pieces. The fourteen tracks are woven together to create a meditation in sound on something so fundamental that it is often taken for granted. The Norwegian violinist’s eclectic programme moves through light’s infinitely subtle qualities to reveal a musical world of boundless shades of emotion and expression. Find out more about @Meredi here: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/meredi/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Meredi.composer Twitter: https://twitter.com/meredi__ TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@meredicomposer Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCExmNdK7F_4MWBW6nMwcjdw Featured dancer: Nae Nishimura Video produced by VIERLIVE https://vier.live/ Venue: Ekebergparken www.ekebergparken.com Artwork: James Turrell: Ganzfeld: Double Vision, 2013. © James Turrell / BONO Dan Graham: Ekeberg Pavilion, 2013. © Dan Graham / Bono Style: All clothes courtesy of and designed by ESP OSLO https://esp-oslo.no/ Management: Polyarts www.polyarts.co.uk Mari Samuelsen, Scoring Berlin & Jonathan Stockhammer – Meredi: White Flowers Take Their Bath Listen to 'LYS': https://DG.lnk.to/lys Subscribe here for more classical video clips – The Best Of Classical Music: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-DG Discover full concert performances on DG Premium - registration and basic library are free: https://www.dg-premium.com Get your front row ticket here for exclusive streams and world premieres with leading artists: https://www.dg-stage.com #MariSamuelsen #LYS #Violin
·youtube.com·
Mari Samuelsen, Scoring Berlin & Jonathan Stockhammer – Meredi: White Flowers Take Their Bath - YouTube
Max Cooper - Symphony in Acid (Official video by Ksawery Komputery)
Max Cooper - Symphony in Acid (Official video by Ksawery Komputery)
Symphony in Acid is a stunning visual art and music project by Max Cooper from his new album Unspoken Words. It was created by the polish graphic designer, animator, and programmer Ksawery Komputery. You can watch it as a video on Vimeo or YouTube, but I recommend using it in the browser because the project reacts to inputs by mouse and keyboard.
·youtube.com·
Max Cooper - Symphony in Acid (Official video by Ksawery Komputery)
Why the Past 10 Years of American Life Have Been Uniquely Stupid
Why the Past 10 Years of American Life Have Been Uniquely Stupid
It’s not just a phase.
The story of Babel is the best metaphor I have found for what happened to America in the 2010s, and for the fractured country we now inhabit. Something went terribly wrong, very suddenly. We are disoriented, unable to speak the same language or recognize the same truth. We are cut off from one another and from the past.
It’s been clear for quite a while now that red America and blue America are becoming like two different countries claiming the same territory, with two different versions of the Constitution, economics, and American history.
Social scientists have identified at least three major forces that collectively bind together successful democracies: social capital (extensive social networks with high levels of trust), strong institutions, and shared stories. Social media has weakened all three.
·theatlantic.com·
Why the Past 10 Years of American Life Have Been Uniquely Stupid
Population COLLAPSE is Coming - Elon Musk Dr. Shanna Swan & Jordan Peterson
Population COLLAPSE is Coming - Elon Musk Dr. Shanna Swan & Jordan Peterson
Speakers in order: Elon Musk, Chamath Palihapitiya, Dr. Shanna Swan, Jodan B. Peterson, Chris Williamson, Dave Chappelle. Elon Musk is the founder, CEO, and lead designer of SpaceX; co-founder, CEO, and product architect of Tesla, Inc.; co-founder and CEO of Neuralink; co-founder of PayPal; and founder of the Boring Company. He is revolutionizing the auto industry, traffic, transportation, space travel, artificial intelligence and sustainable energy. Chamath Palihapitiya is a Sri Lankan-born Canadian and American venture capitalist, engineer, SPAC sponsor, founder and CEO of Social Capital. Palihapitiya was an early senior executive at Facebook, working at the company from 2007 to 2011. Following his departure from Facebook, Palihapitiya started his fund, The Social+Capital Partnership, through which he invested in several companies, including Yammer and Slack. The Social+Capital Partnership changed its name to Social Capital in 2015. He is a co-host of technology podcast All In. The segment that featured Elon Musk and Chamath Palihapitiya is from the 2022 All In Summit. Full conversation can been seen here. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CnxzrX9tNoc&t=3185s Shanna H. Swan, Ph.D., is one of the world’s leading environmental and reproductive epidemiologists and a professor of environmental medicine and public health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. An award-winning scientist, her work examines the impact of environmental exposures, including chemicals such as phthalates and Bisphenol A, on men’s and women’s reproductive health and the neurodevelopment of children. Please check out Dr. Swan's new book, "Count Down" - How Our Modern World Is Threatening Sperm Counts, Altering Male and Female Reproductive Development, and Imperiling the Future of the Human Race By Shanna Swan, PhD, with Stacey Colino For more info about Dr. Swan visit here website https://bit.ly/3Of42S4 or check out our previous animation together https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uo-kSxHNSDQ&t=619s Jordan Peterson is a Canadian clinical psychologist and a professor of psychology at the University of Toronto. His main areas of study are in abnormal, social, and personality psychology, with a focus in assessment and improvement of personality and performance. Now, Peterson travels the world giving lectures on self-development. To view the full conversation between Jordan Peterson and Chris Williamson: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=laSK7Pxh0_8&t=3095s David Chappelle is an American stand-up comedian, actor, writer, and producer, best known for his satirical comedy sketch series Chappelle's Show (2003 - 2006). Chappelle is the recipient of numerous accolades, including two Emmy Awards and three Grammy Awards as well as a Mark Twain Prize. Dave Chappelle is renowned for his ability to point out the underlying truths in society and bring humor to serious issues. Dave Chappelle's quote at the end of this video is from his podcast with Joe Rogan Episode # 1647 Please consider supporting After Skool on Patreon https://bit.ly/39Sgiss Visit our site at https://bit.ly/3L6oKRI Check out the new After Skool prints! https://bit.ly/3yp7YdW Or send us an email at afterskool100@gmail.com
·youtube.com·
Population COLLAPSE is Coming - Elon Musk Dr. Shanna Swan & Jordan Peterson
The media is run by trolls
The media is run by trolls
The Star Wars franchise has always been a cultural mirror, with each manifestation reflecting the fears, hopes, and political themes of the moment it was created. The original 1977 film was steeped in the anxieties of a postwar landscape; the late-Nineties prequel trilogy is imbued with the lighthearted confidence (and excessive CGI use) of the pre-social internet era. And as its latest property, Obi Wan Kenobi, is released, a post from the official Star Wars Twitter account launches in to the culture wars. “We are proud to welcome Moses Ingram to the Star Wars family and excited for Reva’s story to unfold,” it read, alongside a photo of its newest cast member. “If anyone intends to make her feel in any way unwelcome, we have only one thing to say: we resist.” And then, just in case you didn’t get the message, there was a follow-up tweet: “There are more than 20 million sentient species in the Star Wars galaxy, don’t choose to be a racist.” Suggesting millions of Star Wars fans are a bunch of racists-in-waiting might seem like a peculiar PR strategy. But if you were to plot the marketing trajectory of Star Wars alongside the fall of traditional journalism, a pattern would begin to emerge. Today’s predominant mode of cultural engagement began incubating on Tumblr around 2010, spread to mainstream media in the lead-up to America’s 2016 election, and now dominates the entire cultural apparatus up to and including Hollywood itself. It owes much to the 2008 recession, and the mass layoffs in media which fundamentally transformed how news was covered. Imagine a horde of freshly unemployed veteran writers, alongside new journalism grads, desperately trying to claw out a livelihood in a world where writing had been completely devalued. (It was not unusual, at this time, to be told that the job you were applying for paid not in money but “exposure”.) Gone was the $2-per-word magazine staff writer position; gone was the local shoe-leather reporting job that might launch a lifelong career. Now, a writer’s best option was freelance blogging, churning out listicles and aggregated new stories at $15 a pop — and with a quota, which at some outlets ran as high as 20 posts per day. The pressure to produce content on such an accelerated timeline spawned a lot of half-arsed, hastily-executed work (“10 Times Brad Pitt’s Butt Made Me Want To Die: A List In GIFs”) but also created a constant scramble for something, anything, to write about. Social media, then in its infancy, was a lifesaver: as a reporter at MTV News, I could curate a quick roundup of Twitter or Tumblr reactions to last night’s Game of Thrones episode in less than 20 minutes, which allowed me to meet my quota while also prioritising more interesting, time-consuming work (for instance, getting a trauma surgeon to assess whether it was actually, medically possible for The Mountain to crush Oberyn Martell’s skull like a grape). More from this author The cruel world of yoga By Kat Rosenfield At the time, this interface between reporters and random posters was both friendly and fully symbiotic: the writers got free content, the posters increased their internet clout. And crucially, nobody took any of it all that seriously; even being cruel could earn you a coveted place in the Celebs Read Mean Tweets roundup on Jimmy Kimmel Live. But, in 2014, as cash-strapped media outlets chose to prioritise opinion journalism (quick and cheap) over investigative reporting (time-consuming and expensive), the news cycle became increasingly outrage-driven, and our thinking about the type of post that was deemed worthy of coverage changed. The saga of Justine Sacco had recently introduced a hungry populace to the joys of playing hunt-the-racist on Twitter. The US was becoming more tribal, and art, in turn, more political. The ridiculous culture war known as Gamergate consumed the discourse for months on end, as did a massive controversy over the new, all-female Ghostbusters reboot. Liking this movie — even just liking the idea of it — meant you were one of the good guys. Disliking it, on the other hand, marked you as not just a critic, but a Bad Person. The new Star Wars trilogy, then, was perfectly positioned to become a flashpoint in this newest culture war — a war that directly benefited a media economy in which controversy meant clicks. Its first piece of promotional material could not have been more perfectly designed to provoke the ire of the franchise’s less-enlightened fans: a teaser, released in November 2014, featuring the actor John Boyega dressed as a stormtrooper. This is not to say that the Star Wars publicity department wanted racists to take aim at the trailer, but given the number of pieces about “racist Star Wars fans” which followed over the next 24 hours, they would also have had to be idiots not to realise they’d stumbled on marketing gold. At the same time, celebrities had cottoned on to the value of clapping back on social media. Responding to a random dickhead was no longer undignified or beneath them, but the quickest, easiest way to get positive press. So when Boyega made an Instagram post addressing the black stormtrooper controversy, the internet went wild. A representative post about Boyega’s clapback reveals how easy it was to map this new, slightly sanctimonious mode of media coverage onto the existing social media-based story model. All you needed was a vaguely clickbaity headline (“JOHN BOYEGA SHUT DOWN RACIST ‘STAR WARS’ HATERS WITH FOUR SIMPLE WORDS”), followed by 250 lightly editorialised words about the incident, followed by two embedded tweets showcasing the alleged racism, rounded off with Boyega’s post and a boilerplate link back to the Force Awakens teaser. Suggested reading Given my time again, I wouldn't choose journalism By Sarah Ditum But what it also reveals, in hindsight, is how this mode of coverage blurred the boundaries between identifying a trend and manufacturing one. The two embedded tweets in that piece had a total of 11 retweets between them, suggesting that the sentiment within them were anything but popular. If not for the existing practice of trawling Twitter for “people are saying” stories — and if not for the absurd expectation that journalists should post new material every hour — there would never have been any reason to dig them up. The racist haters would have simply languished in obscurity, their tweets lost to the sands of time. This would have been a good time for culture writers to step back, both from the quota model of journalism and from its engagement with stupid social media controversies. But this was 2015, which was followed by the year in which progressives abandoned all pretence of being culture war noncombatants and went all-in on sneering contempt. The purest form of this shift is Molly Lambert’s article, “Angry baby-men hate the new Ghostbusters trailer”. In hindsight, the “baby-men” article marked a point of no return. The ossified smugness of it, the right-side-of-history certainty, the way that books and movies and television and music now sorted automatically on political grounds into things one ought to be either for or against. By the time the new Ghostbusters was actually released, the criticism of it was not criticism so much as a celebration of its mere existence, so that any assessment of whether it was good or not became entirely irrelevant. (It was, for the record, not good.) And Star Wars was an opportunity like no other to stick it to the baby-men. It was about strong female characters, and intergalactic diversity, and standing up against the fascist forces of the Trump admi… uh, I mean, the Empire. By the time The Last Jedi came out in December 2017, the American Left had so thoroughly fused its pop culture with its politics that it was no longer possible to discern if the “Resistance” movement people kept referring to was the one with the spaceships, or the one with those ludicrous pink hats. By 2020, every Star Wars news cycle included stories about how the franchise’s forays into diversity continued to infuriate its toxic fanbase. This brings us back to Obi Wan Kenobi and Moses Ingram, a story whose trajectory is as good an example as any of how Hollywood has learned to leverage this aspect of the discourse. On 22 May, Ingram told The Independent that she’d been warned about racist Star Wars fans by none other than the execs at Lucasfilm, and took a light jab at the lack of diversity in the franchise: “If you’ve got talking droids and aliens but no people of colour, it doesn’t make sense.” The Independent led with that quote, and the interview was dutifully re-reported over the next few days by multiple outlets — under such provocative headlines as “Lucasfilm Warned ‘Obi-Wan’ Star Moses Ingram About Racist ‘Star Wars’ Trolls”. And within a week, Ingram began posting screenshots of abusive messages she’d received on Instagram, including one calling her a “diversity hire”. From there, it was a short distance to the “don’t be racist” tweet from the official Star Wars account. As of this writing, it has been retweeted upwards of 30,000 times, and dozens of mainstream media outlets from NPR to the Daily Show have run at least one story about it. Suggested reading Antiracism won't save you By Tomiwa Owolade None of this is to say that racist Star Wars fans do not exist. They do; the question is whether they are emboldened, even incentivised, by this continued, bizarre symbiosis with an outrage-driven media that relies on them for content. Consider one of the top citations in these stories, a YouTube video titled “Obi-Wan Series Is Going To Be AWFUL Because It’s Hiding Behind Diversity AGAIN!”, apparently made in response to Ingram’s 22 May comments in the Independent. The video is objectively offensive (the word “darkies” appears in the thumbnail), and the creator, an account named MechaRandom42, seems to specialise in intentionally inflammatory content with an anti...
Today’s predominant mode of cultural engagement began incubating on Tumblr around 2010, spread to mainstream media in the lead-up to America’s 2016 election, and now dominates the entire cultural apparatus up to and including Hollywood itself.
Imagine a horde of freshly unemployed veteran writers, alongside new journalism grads, desperately trying to claw out a livelihood in a world where writing had been completely devalued. (It was not unusual, at this time, to be told that the job you were applying for paid not in money but “exposure”.) Gone was the $2-per-word magazine staff writer position; gone was the local shoe-leather reporting job that might launch a lifelong career. Now, a writer’s best option was freelance blogging, churning out listicles and aggregated new stories at $15 a pop — and with a quota, which at some outlets ran as high as 20 posts per day.
But, in 2014, as cash-strapped media outlets chose to prioritise opinion journalism (quick and cheap) over investigative reporting (time-consuming and expensive), the news cycle became increasingly outrage-driven, and our thinking about the type of post that was deemed worthy of coverage changed.
·unherd.com·
The media is run by trolls
#1836 - Ryan Holiday
#1836 - Ryan Holiday
Listen to this episode from The Joe Rogan Experience on Spotify. Ryan Holiday is a writer, media strategist, and author of multiple books, including "Lives of the Stoics: The Art of Living from Zeno to Marcus Aurelius," Stillness is the Key," and "Trust Me, I'm Lying: Confessions of a Media Manipulator." He's the host of "The Daily Stoic" podcast. http://www.ryanholiday.net/ http://www.dailystoic.com/
·open.spotify.com·
#1836 - Ryan Holiday
The Folly of Liberal History
The Folly of Liberal History
Check out https://bit.ly/3gjiOZM and use the code Kraut to get 85% off a 2 year plan and 3 months for free! A recently reemerging idea in the English speaking political landscape is that history is the story of an almost natural progression of humanity into liberty culminating within English and American democracy. This is nonsense. And it also has a name: "whig history" In this video I would like to show you why whig history is bunk, and also detail to you how economic liberties that are so often praised by advocates of whig history, can very often result in the creation of oligarchies that then proceed to undermine and destroy the very economic liberties that created the oligarchy in the first place. ►You can support my channel on Patreon here: https://bit.ly/3OULqH2 ►You can also support me on PayPal here: https://bit.ly/3ubTwTO ►You can support me on ko-fi here: https://bit.ly/3y8Dnzn ►You can follow my twitter here: https://twitter.com/notreallykraut ►You can also follow me on Instagram here: https://bit.ly/3uggiJY ►You can discuss this video on my subreddit: https://bit.ly/3ue5HPM ►You can follow and watch me on twitch here: https://twitter.com/Der_Parrot ►You can join my community, give feedback and talk to me here: https://bit.ly/3y9G7N0 Sponsorship (0:00) Intro (0:56) A short political history of medieval Hungary (2:37) The Hungarian oligarchy ​(3:34) The Decline of Oligarchy (06:00) What is whig history (07:33) The rise and fall of Venice (11:38) Warnings of Oligarchy (16:11) The birth of American Oligarchy (18:05) The death of American Oligarchy (23:34) A warning from History? (25:33) Outro (27:16) Sources: Why Nations Fail by Darren Acemoglu The Origins of Political Order by Francis Fukuyama Music: Nocturne in B flat minor, Op. 9 no. 1 Symphony no. 5 in Cm, Op. 67 - IV. Allegro (For Recorder Ensemble - Papalin) Nocturne in E flat major, Op. 9 no. 2 Violin Concerto in G minor, RV 315 'Summer' - Complete Concerto https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fr2elwfXim8 You might be interested in this video too: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=404IeUzGNZ4 Thank you again, and don't forget to subscribe to watch more.
·youtube.com·
The Folly of Liberal History
BINARY DREAMS: How A.I. Sees the Universe
BINARY DREAMS: How A.I. Sees the Universe
What happens when machines begin to question their origins? In this short film created with generative art, we explore how artificial intelligence sees the universe, its creators, and its potential futures. I believe the emergence of artistic A.I. has touched off a new era for art that could be as profound as the first cave paintings, 50,000 years ago. If these artistic capabilities are possible after only a few decades of A.I., research, what will the next 50,000 years hold? What will we become? Crafted by Melodysheep in collaboration with artificial intelligence. Supported by the good people at Protocol Labs: protocol.ai Special Thanks: Midjourney Cruz Abalos Naomi Augustine Juan Benet Matthew Brown Zeus Kontoyannis Morrison Waud My Patreon supporters: patreon.com/melodysheep Hope LaVelle Tommy Collier Jackson Hills Fabricio Bloisi Totally Normal RapalStudio.com Calisa Nickelson Romain Gilliot Symi K Frank Buschmann Brenden Dearie Yueqi Wang Axel Vei Erik Cheatham Micah Mangione Eric Capuano Kimi Ushida TabloidA WhiskersTea Justin Walsh Jeremy Taylor Caleb Braun Joshyori Adrien Moulin yassir selouani Kailen Huse David August Jeremiah Tims Joan Miguel Klagges David Balland Michael Denny Illarion Petrov gayathri baskaran Logan Caleb Levesque Greysen Paige Derick Yan Brandon Sanders
·youtube.com·
BINARY DREAMS: How A.I. Sees the Universe