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Ten Years Ago
Ten Years Ago
See what the internet looked like on February 19th, 2011. See what it looked like ten years today for a handful of popular sites (CNN, NYT, Amazon, Apple, IMDb, GoodReads, etc.).
neal.fun
Ten Years Ago
drawing.garden
drawing.garden
馃尡 A small project by Ben Moren: gardening, but with emojis and less time 馃尶
drawing.garden
drawing.garden
Mandy Brown: Hypertext for all
Mandy Brown: Hypertext for all
There鈥檚 an old saw about the web that says that when the web democratized publishing, everyone should have become a writer, but instead most of us became consumers. (Nevermind that email and SMS have most people writing more in a day than their Victorian ancestors wrote in their entire lives.) There鈥檚 more than a hint of disparagement and elitism in that saying: everyone should have taken up writing, which is obviously superior to reading or watching or (gasp!) consuming. And I worry that that same sentiment creeps in when we argue the supremacy of text over image on the web. Writing is an important and valuable skill, but so are many other things. Here鈥檚 another way to think about it: over the past year, video after video has emerged showing cops shooting unarmed black people. Those videos have been shared on the web, and while they haven鈥檛 yet led to anything resembling justice for the victims, they have contributed to profound discussions around race, militarized police forces, guns, and more. They are not sufficient to bring about desperately needed social change鈥攁nd there鈥檚 an argument to be made about whether they are at risk of becoming mere spectacle鈥攂ut I think it would be hard to deny that they are an important element in the movement, that they have had a major impact. 鈥 I worry that the push to keep the web defined to words, while pragmatic and reasonable in many ways, may also be used to decide what stories get told, and what stories are heard. Many more people are using their tiny computers to record video and audio and take pictures than are writing; as much as I may love writing, and as much as I know that transmitting writing via cables and air is a hell of a lot easier and cheaper than transmitting video, I鈥檓 not sure I can really stand here and say that the writing is鈥攐r should be鈥攑rimary. One of the design principles of the web is to pave the cowpaths: it looks to me like there are some new paths opening up, ones we may not have expected, ones that aren鈥檛 going to make many of our jobs easier. Maybe instead of putting up signs saying there are better paths elsewhere, it鈥檚 time we see where these ones take us.
aworkinglibrary.com
Mandy Brown: Hypertext for all
Paul Ford: The Group That Rules the Web (New Yorker)
Paul Ford: The Group That Rules the Web (New Yorker)
The Web started out as a way to publish and share documents. It is now an operating system: a big, digital sensory apparatus that can tell you about your phone鈥檚 battery life, record and transmit your voice, manage your e-mail and your chats, and give you games to play. It can do this all at once, and with far less grand of a design than you might assume.
newyorker.com
Paul Ford: The Group That Rules the Web (New Yorker)
Anil Dash: Clouds for People, or the Consumerization of the Cloud
Anil Dash: Clouds for People, or the Consumerization of the Cloud
This is smart, and prescient. Through this lens, a huge part of the entire mobile app phenomenon that iPhone really catalyzed is merely an impact of moving so much computing power to the edge of the mobile phone network, instead of trying to provide so many services through archaic centralized infrastructure. Put simply: Move the brains to the edge of the network, and you get great new kinds of apps. We don't know what the Angry Birds or Draw Something of the server-side web app world looks like right now, because right now there's no way for consumers to buy it.
dashes.com
Anil Dash: Clouds for People, or the Consumerization of the Cloud
Brett Bonfield: An Interview with Paul Ford and Gina Trapani (In the Library with the Lead Pipe)
Brett Bonfield: An Interview with Paul Ford and Gina Trapani (In the Library with the Lead Pipe)
Paul Ford: I don鈥檛 really make decisions. Instead, I pick my friends carefully. Then I go where people ask me to go; when no one needs me to go anywhere or do anything I work on longer essays that I鈥檒l publish some day.
inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org
Brett Bonfield: An Interview with Paul Ford and Gina Trapani (In the Library with the Lead Pipe)
Paul Ford: Why Facebook Has Not Already Peaked (New York Magazine)
Paul Ford: Why Facebook Has Not Already Peaked (New York Magazine)
Which brings us back to the question: Have we reached peak Facebook? And no, we haven鈥檛. Even if Facebook never adds another user, it will keep growing: It has become a fundamental substrate, a difficult-to-avoid component of any site or app that requires users to register鈥攎aking it essential to nearly every major web innovation now and in the future. There鈥檚 a related question: Is Facebook ever going to be cool again? That鈥檚 like asking 鈥淚s the phone company cool?鈥 The interface may not be exciting anymore, but the network is very, very cool, in the disruptively awesome way that enormous things are: volcanoes, aircraft carriers, the New Deal.
nymag.com
Paul Ford: Why Facebook Has Not Already Peaked (New York Magazine)
Dylan Tweney: Why Instagram is worth $1 billion, and your startup isn鈥檛 (VentureBeat)
Dylan Tweney: Why Instagram is worth $1 billion, and your startup isn鈥檛 (VentureBeat)
Instagram succeeded for many good reasons, including its design, its viral qualities, its simplicity, and the fact that its engineers focused so obsessively on making sure that it works all the time. Part of its success, no doubt, is the fact that it was just in the right place, at the right time, with the right, crowd-pleasing mix of features.
venturebeat.com
Dylan Tweney: Why Instagram is worth $1 billion, and your startup isn鈥檛 (VentureBeat)
Anil Dash: Foursquare: Today's best-executing startup
Anil Dash: Foursquare: Today's best-executing startup
鈥楾here are lots of loud, pointless headlines about companies getting money from venture capitalists or angel investors. What I鈥檇 love to see more of in 2012 (and beyond!) is headlines about how a few small successes with users are a demonstration of a small company outperforming and out-innovating the biggest companies in the tech industry by being focused and disciplined in their execution. That, actually, is my most favorite Foursquare feature.鈥
dashes.com
Anil Dash: Foursquare: Today's best-executing startup
Anil Dash: All in Favor
Anil Dash: All in Favor
Why Anil favorites so much. 鈥業n short, favoriting or liking things for me is a performative act, but one that's accessible to me with the low threshold of a simple gesture. It's the sort of thing that can only happen online, but if I could smile at a person in the real world in a way that would radically increase the likelihood that others would smile at that person, too, then I'd be doing that all day long.鈥
dashes.com
Anil Dash: All in Favor
Matt Legend Gemmell: SEO for Non-dicks
Matt Legend Gemmell: SEO for Non-dicks
鈥業鈥檓 asked sometimes for advice on building an internet presence, and I usually have to fumble for an answer 卤 because I haven鈥檛 pursued any particular strategy beyond the glaringly obvious: create original, relevant content repeatedly.鈥
mattgemmell.com
Matt Legend Gemmell: SEO for Non-dicks
Webmin
Webmin
I should install this. 鈥淲ebmin is a web-based interface for system administration for Unix. Using any modern web browser, you can setup user accounts, Apache, DNS, file sharing and much more. Webmin removes the need to manually edit Unix configuration files like /etc/passwd, and lets you manage a system from the console or remotely.鈥
webmin.com
Webmin
tumblr2wp
tumblr2wp
鈥淭umblr2WP makes it super simple to transfer your Tumblr content to your own, self-hosted WordPress install. This tool will create a WXR (WordPress eXtended RSS) file from your tumblr site which can be imported into WordPress.鈥
tumblr2wp.com
tumblr2wp