The Daily Plan Bar
The Daily Plan Bar
This past year I’ve started using a modified form of the Bullet Journal approach, using a dot-grid notebook, thanks to a gift of an…
·medium.com·
The Daily Plan Bar
Back to Basics: Your Weekly Review
Back to Basics: Your Weekly Review
Schedule your weekly review in your calendar. Allow yourself at least an hour, preferably two. Finish all your work before the review starts. Get comfortable. You might want to go somewhere you don’t associate with work. Take 5-10 minutes of quiet time. Meditate, doodle, or just stare at the head – whatever it takes to put a “buffer” between you and your everyday stuff. Have something to write in/on. Make sure you won’t be disturbed. This is your time!
Collect all your loose papers and put them into your inbox for processing. Process your notes to glean any action items, appointments, new projects, etc. Review your previous calendar data to remind you of any ideas, tasks, etc. that you might not have captured at the time. Review your upcoming calendar to see if there are any new actions you need to add to your lists. Empty your head. Write down anything that’s currently on your mind or capturing your attention. Review your project lists to determine each project’s status and if there are any actions you need to take to move each of them forward. Review your next action lists. Bring them up to date by marking off any actions you’ve already completed. Use completed actions as triggers to remind you of any further steps you need to take not that an action is done. Review waiting for lists. Add appropriate follow-ups to your action lists. Check off anything that you’ve already received. Review any relevant checklists. Review your someday/maybe list and decide if there is anything you’re ready to move onto your active projects list. Review your project support files to make sure you haven’t missed any new actions you need to take. Be creative and courageous. This is the hardest and most poorly described part of the process in Allen’s books, which is too bad, since this is where the magic happens. Having cleared your mind of everything you need to do at the moment, take time to dream up new ideas — risky ones, creative ones, etc. Essentially a free-form brainstorming session around the topic of “what could I be doing?”
What do I have to work on the next few days? What deadlines do I have coming up? Are there any new projects I have time to start working on?
·lifehack.org·
Back to Basics: Your Weekly Review
The Weekly Review: A Productivity Ritual to Get More Done
The Weekly Review: A Productivity Ritual to Get More Done
A weekly review is an opportunity to direct your life with intention – reflect on the past week, plan for the week ahead, and ensure your to-do list is aligned with your bigger goals.
What did I get done this week versus what I planned to get done? What unexpectedly arose this week that blocked my productivity? Why was I so efficient this week as compared to the last one?
Collect loose papers and materials — Capture and sort items like receipts and business cards you’ve collected over the week. Get “in” to empty — Process all your notes, emails, texts, and any other “incoming” items. Empty your head — Write down anything that’s taken up mind space recently but hasn’t been captured in your system.
Review “Next Actions” lists — Take inventory of the tasks and reminders you have coming up. Review previous calendar data — Flip through the last 2-3 weeks of calendar items to look for any outstanding items of things that may require follow-up. Review upcoming calendar — Zoom in on the future by looking ahead at your calendar items. Ensure that anything you need to prepare for is captured on your task list. Review “Waiting For” list — Reflect on outstanding items you need from others and make a note of what requires follow-up or impacts your own work. Review “Projects” (and “Larger Outcome”) Lists — Look through any and all project lists to assess their progress and make additional action items to drive initiatives forward.
·todoist.com·
The Weekly Review: A Productivity Ritual to Get More Done
How to set up GTD using Notion
How to set up GTD using Notion
Want to implement GTD using Notion but don't know where to begin? We break down the basics, implement it in Notion and share a free template.
·radreads.co·
How to set up GTD using Notion
r/dataisbeautiful
r/dataisbeautiful
r/dataisbeautiful: DataIsBeautiful is for visualizations that effectively convey information. Aesthetics are an important part of information …
·reddit.com·
r/dataisbeautiful
Melissa Lim on Twitter
Melissa Lim on Twitter
The factors of happiness, according to a Duke University study. Sketchnote by @tnvora via @MindShiftKQED https://t.co/XWRO5ySF9M https://t.co/mrEr4UHARi
·twitter.com·
Melissa Lim on Twitter
"When you're new to the profession, your instincts may tell you to keep your head down, and if you don't know something, don't admit it. But if that's the case, says Rachael, your instincts are wrong. "You look sillier for not asking the question," she points out. "Nobody bites, and nobody expects you to know all the business lingo already. So just ask!" "That particularly applies when you first start your job, adds Carolien Grebe, client manager at JDO London. "It's very important to have the best understanding possible of the role you're joining and the expectations the team has of you," she says. "When I started, I wish I had asked even more questions."
"When you're new to the profession, your instincts may tell you to keep your head down, and if you don't know something, don't admit it. But if that's the case, says Rachael, your instincts are wrong. "You look sillier for not asking the question," she points out. "Nobody bites, and nobody expects you to know all the business lingo already. So just ask!" "That particularly applies when you first start your job, adds Carolien Grebe, client manager at JDO London. "It's very important to have the best understanding possible of the role you're joining and the expectations the team has of you," she says. "When I started, I wish I had asked even more questions."
·creativeboom.com·
"When you're new to the profession, your instincts may tell you to keep your head down, and if you don't know something, don't admit it. But if that's the case, says Rachael, your instincts are wrong. "You look sillier for not asking the question," she points out. "Nobody bites, and nobody expects you to know all the business lingo already. So just ask!" "That particularly applies when you first start your job, adds Carolien Grebe, client manager at JDO London. "It's very important to have the best understanding possible of the role you're joining and the expectations the team has of you," she says. "When I started, I wish I had asked even more questions."
Alan Henry on being Seen, Heard, and Paid on Player FM
Alan Henry on being Seen, Heard, and Paid on Player FM
"A colleague had no meeting day and it was respected. So I tried no meeting Thursday. " And I realized people booked over me. I pushed back and they'd make it out like the "The time I spent meant less to them than getting what they wanted." "How do I acknowledge the social baggage that people of color and also anyone marginalized in the workplace in a way that helps us get ahead." "This is where gaslighting can really cripple a person. You don't immediately say you're being targetted. You think, there's something wrong with me." "It was a sentiment heads from other black colleagues." Alan Henry, WIRED editor and author of the new book SEEN, HEARD and PAID: The New Work Rules for the Marginalized,
·player.fm·
Alan Henry on being Seen, Heard, and Paid on Player FM
Getting Things Done: Ep. 158: David Allen talks with Natalie Nagele
Getting Things Done: Ep. 158: David Allen talks with Natalie Nagele
"People are like I'm getting a lot done. That's not the point. "Do you have clarity and space in your head to know what you're not getting done? Almost universally it's like no. That's what Getting Things Done has done for me. That's what helps people sit down and read it. It can make an impact"
·gettingthingsdone.libsyn.com·
Getting Things Done: Ep. 158: David Allen talks with Natalie Nagele
The Pudding
The Pudding
The Pudding explains ideas debated in culture with visual essays.
·pudding.cool·
The Pudding