Productivity

Productivity

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The Daily Plan Bar
The Daily Plan Bar
This past year I’ve started using a modified form of the Bullet Journal approach, using a dot-grid notebook, thanks to a gift of an…
·medium.com·
The Daily Plan Bar
GTD Notion: How to get MORE things done in Notion
GTD Notion: How to get MORE things done in Notion
👉 https://10k.radreads.co/join-syp10?utm_source=youtubeReady to design your perfect productivity system in Notion? Our flagship course Supercharge Your Prod...
·youtube.com·
GTD Notion: How to get MORE things done in Notion
The Only Notion Tutorial you'll ever need
The Only Notion Tutorial you'll ever need
Notion is a powerful new productivity tool but its feature overload can be intimidating. Here's a 13 video tutorial to build your first Notion page.
·radreads.co·
The Only Notion Tutorial you'll ever need
Getting Things Done: Ep. 158: David Allen talks with Natalie Nagele
Getting Things Done: Ep. 158: David Allen talks with Natalie Nagele
"People are like I'm getting a lot done. That's not the point. "Do you have clarity and space in your head to know what you're not getting done? Almost universally it's like no. That's what Getting Things Done has done for me. That's what helps people sit down and read it. It can make an impact"
·gettingthingsdone.libsyn.com·
Getting Things Done: Ep. 158: David Allen talks with Natalie Nagele
How to get the most out of your health insurance plan by Life Kit
How to get the most out of your health insurance plan by Life Kit
Using your health insurance doesn't have to be on an "in-case-of-emergency" basis. Learn how to make the most of your coverage by taking advantage of preventative care, strategically timing procedures and getting exercise classes covered.
·player.fm·
How to get the most out of your health insurance plan by Life Kit
How to give the perfect toast by Life Kit
How to give the perfect toast by Life Kit
It's the wild card of every big event — the toast. If you're giving a new year's toast, a best man or maid of honor speech, or any other toasts this coming year, we've got some tips to make sure people remember your toast with fondness and not horror.
·player.fm·
How to give the perfect toast by Life Kit
Notion
Notion
Your one-stop guide to going from Notion newbie to ninja. Find tutorials, templates, comparisons to other tools and advanced guides.
·radreads.co·
Notion
Getting Things Done (GTD) Method and 26 Best GTD Apps & Tools - nTask
Getting Things Done (GTD) Method and 26 Best GTD Apps & Tools - nTask
"Often times, the human mind acts like a big hoarder of ideas, no matter how trivial they are. "To convert all these muddled ideas into viable actions, you need to distinguish the actionable and non-actionable tasks to get rid of the ones that cannot be done, thus clearing up some brain memory."
break them into smaller, more manageable actions to clear the clutter and get a clear picture of what lies ahead in operations processes.
convert all these muddled ideas into viable actions, you need to distinguish the actionable and non-actionable tasks to get rid of the ones that cannot be done, thus clearing up some brain memory.
Waiting for List: all the tasks that you have delegated to other people for execution Next Action List: actions that need to be done, but are without any due date Calendar: actions that are to be completed on a specific date or time
·ntaskmanager.com·
Getting Things Done (GTD) Method and 26 Best GTD Apps & Tools - nTask
GTD 101: The Beginner's Guide to Getting Things Done
GTD 101: The Beginner's Guide to Getting Things Done
By failing
By failing to review consistently, they just let things pile up and it gets harder and harder to keep up with their system. They can get the system set up, but then they try to “set it and forget it.” They don’t maintain it. When it comes to your productivity, you need to be consistently reviewing and making adjustments in order to get things done. It’s important to clean up and update your lists, dump any new loose ends into your trusted system, and clear your mind so everything can run smoothly. At Asian Efficiency, we recommend that you do this weekly. Yes, it takes a little bit of time, but the benefit of feeling like you’re finally in control of your life by far outweighs the cost.
·asianefficiency.com·
GTD 101: The Beginner's Guide to Getting Things Done
Getting Things Done: Your Step-By-Step Guide
Getting Things Done: Your Step-By-Step Guide
Capture Everything: Capture anything that crosses your mind. Nothing is too big or small! These items go directly into your inboxes. Clarify: Process what you’ve captured into clear and concrete action steps. Decide if an item is a project, next action, or reference. Organize: Put everything into the right place. Add dates to your calendar, delegate projects to other people, file away reference material, and sort your tasks. Review: Frequently look over, update, and revise your lists. Engage: Get to work on the important stuff.
·todoist.com·
Getting Things Done: Your Step-By-Step Guide
What are _you_ 'waiting on?' | 43 Folders
What are _you_ 'waiting on?' | 43 Folders
- Things I need from someone to accomplish current, due tasks. These are serious barriers that are potentially stopping deadlines from being met. Gratefully I seldom have more than an item or two here. This would be something like a new logo I need for a site that launches this week; something I need to bang on daily to make sure progress continues without interruption. Follow-up - These items cover middle-term events and deliverables that I just need “soon.” These might include things I know will arrive soon or eventually like incoming essays for The Long Winters’ site (that’s a passive-aggressive ping, Mr. Roderick) or a form I need to fill out for a client’s records in order to get paid. Occasional check-in - These are things that I hope happen soon but have no way to anticipate or predict. Still, I’d like to know about when it does happen so I check in every week or two. For me this includes stuff like a new software release or support for a feature I’d like in an app I’m thinking of using. The thread that runs through all of these is that the onus is on me to a) make sure these items represent part of a commitment I’ve made, and b) make sure they actually get done (even if it’s not my direct responsibility); otherwise, they should get moved onto my “Maybe/Later” list, right? So the questions on my mind are: How do I make sure I’m checking in often enough? How do I ensure I’m prepared to execute when the items are available? Staying on top of things The simple answer for getting these items done is to convert them into next actions. If I have a “waiting on” item that says “Receive new logo from Jim” for more than a day or two, it might benefit me to generate “Call Jim to nail down delivery date and dependencies for new logo” as a next action. Now I’m in the driver’s seat, ensuring that bad communication or just old-school slack don’t prevent my client’s cool new site from launching on time.
·43folders.com·
What are _you_ 'waiting on?' | 43 Folders
Getting started with "Getting Things Done" | 43 Folders
Getting started with "Getting Things Done" | 43 Folders
identify all the stuff in your life that isn’t in the right place (close all open loops) get rid of the stuff that isn’t yours or you don’t need right now create a right place that you trust and that supports your working style and values put your stuff in the right place, consistently do your stuff in a way that honors your time, your energy, and the context of any given moment iterate and refactor mercilessly
·43folders.com·
Getting started with "Getting Things Done" | 43 Folders
Where should I start with GTD? - Getting Things Done®
Where should I start with GTD? - Getting Things Done®
Yes, anywhere. Any portion or component of the GTD approach, applied, will bring at least a bit more clarity, focus, and control for you—without exception. And very likely when any one thing is executed, it will create a reverberation effect and spread to other parts. It’s a holistic model—i.e. any piece can be worked, and it will add to the whole gestalt.
·gettingthingsdone.com·
Where should I start with GTD? - Getting Things Done®
Getting Things Done: Deciding what shit to do next – Bujo Witchcraft
Getting Things Done: Deciding what shit to do next – Bujo Witchcraft
Context: “What could you possibly do where you are, with the tools you have?” Time available: “How much time do you have between now and the next time you need to do something else?” Energy available: “Which items do you have the mental and/or physical capacity to tackle right now?” Priority: If there’s more than one item left, use the “6 Horizon Model”––which I’ll touch on below in the section “Why bottom-up is better than top-down“
Level 5: Life––as in life purpose and life goals Level 4: Long term visions Level 3: 1-2 year goals Level 2: Areas of focus and responsibilities Level 1: Current projects Ground level: Current actions
David Allen argues the opposite. He posits that when the nitty-gritty, everyday, ground level stuff is out of control, trying to zoom out to big-picture stuff is pointless and futile––and I agree.
·bujowitchcraft.com·
Getting Things Done: Deciding what shit to do next – Bujo Witchcraft
Getting Things Done: So what is all this shit? – Bujo Witchcraft
Getting Things Done: So what is all this shit? – Bujo Witchcraft
This is one of the places where the GTD system truly shines. As David Allen explains several times in the book, to-do lists are often full of items that we can’t actually do. So they sit there, mocking us. We allow ourselves to feel overwhelmed, never realizing that the reason it all feels impossible to tackle is because it is. In its current form, anyway.
Alright, so you’ve determined that you want or need to take action on this item—awesome! Now it’s time to get clear on what the item will look like when it’s finished. What circumstances need to be met in order for you to check it off your list?
·bujowitchcraft.com·
Getting Things Done: So what is all this shit? – Bujo Witchcraft
Evernote folders vs. tags
Evernote folders vs. tags
I am wondering if there is a better way to manage my projects in Evernote. Currently I use these folders: !nbox !nput to Watch, Read or Listen 1 Next 2 Waiting 3 Scheduled 4 Someday/Maybe 5 Completed 6 In-Process Projects 7 Degree Project Support Files 8 Other Project Support Files 9...
Next 2 Waiting 3 Scheduled 4 Someday/Maybe 5 Completed 6 In-Process Projects 7 Degree Project Support Files 8 Other Project Support Files 9 Checklists and Templates 10 Reference
·forum.gettingthingsdone.com·
Evernote folders vs. tags
Getting Things Done – Bujo Witchcraft
Getting Things Done – Bujo Witchcraft
Context: “What could you possibly do where you are, with the tools you have?” Time available: “How much time do you have between now and the next time you need to do something else?” Energy available: “Which items do you have the mental and/or physical capacity to tackle right now?” Priority: If there’s more than one item left, use the “6 Horizon Model”––which I’ll touch on below in the section “Why bottom-up is better than top-down“
David Allen is pretty consistent in his conviction that your intuition will guide you appropriately. Look at your list, and your mind already knows which is the best and most important, so listen to that. However, he recognizes that not everyone feels that they can do that––at least not yet––and so he provides three frameworks for looking at and determining priority.
·bujowitchcraft.com·
Getting Things Done – Bujo Witchcraft
The Creativity of Getting Things Done
The Creativity of Getting Things Done
By imposing a degree of structure, by asking ourselves to behave in a slightly more focused way, we’re giving ourselves an opportunity to develop our creative muscles. It doesn’t always mean that what we create every single time every single day will be an act of great art and beauty, but if indeed the best way to have a good idea is to have a lot of ideas, then using GTD principles to create windows of opportunity to generate lots of ideas, sounds like a good approach.
·gettingthingsdone.com·
The Creativity of Getting Things Done
What is GTD
What is GTD
Write, record, or gather any and everything that has your attention into a collection tool.
Is it actionable? If so, decide the next action and project (if more than one action is required). If not, decide if it is trash, reference, or something to put on hold.
Park reminders of your categorized content in appropriate places.
·gettingthingsdone.com·
What is GTD
10 Tips for Success with GTD
10 Tips for Success with GTD
Write down everything that grabs your attention when it shows up (supporting the idea that your mind is better used to have ideas, not hold them).
Create a game you can win with GTD. Instead of saying you’re going to get your inbox to zero every day, start with an easier goal of once a week. Instead of saying you’re going to do the GTD Weekly Review every week for the next 10 years, try scheduling just the next one. And when you’ve done that one, book the next one after that.
·gettingthingsdone.com·
10 Tips for Success with GTD
Basic GTD: Natural Planning
Basic GTD: Natural Planning
The Natural Planning Model is a productive way to think about projects, because it allows to get maximum value with minimum effort. This is an informal approach that does not require great elaboration. Although you don’t realize it, you usually do these five things to accomplish any task, no matter how simple it is:
You rarely think about your principles consciously, but they exist, and are of particular importance when there are more people involved. You don’t want to reach the result at any cost. If your personal values are violated, you will consider the project as a failure.
·facilethings.com·
Basic GTD: Natural Planning