Studies on Covid

41 bookmarks
Custom sorting
Disruption of the blood-brain barrier due to long COVID
Disruption of the blood-brain barrier due to long COVID
Researchers explored the destruction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) due to cognitive impairment associated with long coronavirus disease (COVID).
·news-medical.net·
Disruption of the blood-brain barrier due to long COVID
Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis with or without uveitis: a novel form of post-acute COVID-19 syndrome in children
Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis with or without uveitis: a novel form of post-acute COVID-19 syndrome in children
Background COVID-19 is a complex multisystem disease, frequently associated with kidney injury. Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, we observed a striking increase in the incidence of acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (aTIN) without or with uveitis (TINUs) among children. This prompted us to examine whether SARS-CoV-2 might be the underlying trigger. Methods We conducted a French nationwide retrospective cohort study. We included all consecutive children diagnosed with aTIN or TINUs of undetermined cause between April-2020 and March-2021. SARS-CoV-2 antibody responses were tested by a luciferase immunoprecipitation system and compared to age-matched controls. Immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and molecular microbiology analyses were performed on kidney biopsies. Results Forty-eight children were included with a median age at diagnosis of 14.7 years (9.4-17.6). aTIN and TINUs incidence rates increased 3-fold and 12-fold, respectively, compared to pre-pandemic years. All patients had impaired kidney function with a median eGFR of 31.9 ml/min/1.73m2 at diagnosis. Kidney biopsies showed lesions of acute tubulointerstitial nephritis and 25% of patients had fibrosis. No patient had concomitant acute COVID-19. All 16 children tested had high anti-N IgG titers and one had anti-S IgGs. Next-generation sequencing failed to detect any infectious agents in kidney biopsies. However, SARS-CoV-2 RNA was detected by PCR in two kidney samples supporting a potential direct link between SARS-CoV-2 and aTIN/TINUs. Conclusions We describe a novel form of post-acute COVID-19 syndrome in children, unique in its exclusive kidney and eye involvement, and its distinctive anti-SARS-CoV-2 N+/S- serological profile. Our results support a causal association linking SARS-CoV-2 infection to this newly-reported burst of renal/eye inflammation. ### Competing Interest Statement The authors have declared no competing interest. ### Funding Statement This study did not receive any funding ### Author Declarations I confirm all relevant ethical guidelines have been followed, and any necessary IRB and/or ethics committee approvals have been obtained. Yes The details of the IRB/oversight body that provided approval or exemption for the research described are given below: Research ethics board approval was granted by the local Ethics Committee of the Assistance Publique Hopitaux de Paris (Decision number: N 2022 0503154702). Informed consent was obtained from all parents or legal guardians; patients were informed about the purpose of the study and gave their assent. I confirm that all necessary patient/participant consent has been obtained and the appropriate institutional forms have been archived, and that any patient/participant/sample identifiers included were not known to anyone (e.g., hospital staff, patients or participants themselves) outside the research group so cannot be used to identify individuals. Yes I understand that all clinical trials and any other prospective interventional studies must be registered with an ICMJE-approved registry, such as ClinicalTrials.gov. I confirm that any such study reported in the manuscript has been registered and the trial registration ID is provided (note: if posting a prospective study registered retrospectively, please provide a statement in the trial ID field explaining why the study was not registered in advance). Yes I have followed all appropriate research reporting guidelines and uploaded the relevant EQUATOR Network research reporting checklist(s) and other pertinent material as supplementary files, if applicable. Yes All data produced in the present work are contained in the manuscript
·medrxiv.org·
Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis with or without uveitis: a novel form of post-acute COVID-19 syndrome in children
Two-Years Follow-Up of Symptoms and Return to Work in Complex Post-COVID-19 Patients
Two-Years Follow-Up of Symptoms and Return to Work in Complex Post-COVID-19 Patients
Introduction: Many COVID-19 patients present with severe long-lasting symptoms. They might benefit from a coordination team to manage such complex situations, but late efficacy still needs to be determined. Population and Methods: Out of 105 contacts, 45 patients had two phone consultations separated by personalized support 15 and 22 months, respectively, after COVID infection. Self-reported symptoms, feelings of improvement and ability to return to work allowed us to determine the efficacy of the therapeutic strategy proposed. Results: Unlike what was expected, many post-COVID-19 patients directly contacted the coordination team and had significant pre-existing comorbidities. Despite exercise, respiratory, olfactory rehabilitations, cognition/speech therapy and/or psychological support, the more frequent self-reported symptoms (fatigue, neurocognitive disorders, muscles and joint pain) did not resolve. However, dyspnea, anxiety and chest pain were significantly reduced. Finally, 2/3 of the patients felt some degree of improvement and returned to work either partially or fully, but 1/3 remained complaining of symptoms and out of work as late as 22 months after COVID occurrence. All patients greatly appreciated the second phone consultation. Conclusions: In such complex situations, besides early and adapted rehabilitations and psychological help allowing better symptom management, relatively simple actions such as a phone call might be very useful to reduce patients’ feelings of abandonment.
·mdpi.com·
Two-Years Follow-Up of Symptoms and Return to Work in Complex Post-COVID-19 Patients
Endemicity Is Not a Victory: The Unmitigated Downside Risks of Widespread SARS-CoV-2 Transmission
Endemicity Is Not a Victory: The Unmitigated Downside Risks of Widespread SARS-CoV-2 Transmission
Researchers show that relying on vaccines alone as a strategy will only result in large increases in virulence for SARS-CoV-2 and minimal loss of transmissibility. Their modeling predicts hundreds of thousands of deaths under many plausible scenarios, with even modest increases in the fatality rate leading to unsustainable mortality burdens. The findings highlight the importance of enacting a concerted strategy and continued development of biomedical interventions to suppress SARS-CoV-2 transmission and slow its evolution.
·mdpi.com·
Endemicity Is Not a Victory: The Unmitigated Downside Risks of Widespread SARS-CoV-2 Transmission
What we now know about long COVID and our brains
What we now know about long COVID and our brains
Researchers provide an extensive review of studies on Covid-19's impact on the brain, showing that nearly 50 percent of people who catch Covid are at risk of developing disabling conditions that resemble stroke. Patients show measurable changes in brain structure.
·pursuit.unimelb.edu.au·
What we now know about long COVID and our brains
Long COVID: major findings, mechanisms and recommendations - Nature Reviews Microbiology
Long COVID: major findings, mechanisms and recommendations - Nature Reviews Microbiology
Researchers conducted an extensive review of current studies on Long Covid in adults and children. They found a wide range of serious, persistent conditions. Basically, Covid can have long-term impacts on every organ in the body, and it affects at least 10 percent of the population. As more people get infected and reinfected, their odds of chronic conditions go up.
·nature.com·
Long COVID: major findings, mechanisms and recommendations - Nature Reviews Microbiology
SARS-CoV-2 infection and persistence in the human body and brain at autopsy
SARS-CoV-2 infection and persistence in the human body and brain at autopsy
Researchers conducted autopsies on Covid-19 patients and found that the virus infects nearly every organ in the body, not just the lungs and respiratory tract. This explains how and why Covid can cause undetected, severe long-term damage.
·nature.com·
SARS-CoV-2 infection and persistence in the human body and brain at autopsy
Large COVID autopsy study finds SARS-CoV-2 all over the human body
Large COVID autopsy study finds SARS-CoV-2 all over the human body
In the most comprehensive autopsy tissue study conducted to date, researchers have found traces of the SARS-CoV-2 virus throughout the entire body, from the brain and the heart to the eyes. The findings indicate the virus can cause persistent infections in many parts of the body, months past an initial illness, and support the argument for further research into antiviral drugs as possible treatment for long COVID.
·newatlas.com·
Large COVID autopsy study finds SARS-CoV-2 all over the human body
Long-COVID in children and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analyses
Long-COVID in children and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analyses
Researchers reviewed 21 studies on Long Covid in children and found that 25 percent experience chronic symptoms that include mood and sleep disorders, along with fatigue. Once again, kids aren’t immune to Covid. They get just as sick as adults.
·nature.com·
Long-COVID in children and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analyses
International study identifies risks for long COVID in children
International study identifies risks for long COVID in children
A new international study done by researchers at three academic medical institutions including UC Davis Health, offers a clearer picture of the risks associated with long COVID in children.
·health.ucdavis.edu·
International study identifies risks for long COVID in children
Asymptomatic SARS-COV-2 infection in children's tonsils
Asymptomatic SARS-COV-2 infection in children's tonsils
Researchers found that Covid-19 can infect children's tonsils and immune cells without causing symptoms. It could make them more vulnerable to secondary infections later.
·sciencedirect.com·
Asymptomatic SARS-COV-2 infection in children's tonsils
Infection with human coronavirus NL63 enhances streptococcal adherence to epithelial cells
Infection with human coronavirus NL63 enhances streptococcal adherence to epithelial cells
Researchers show how coronavirus and influenza infections can increase the severity of secondary bacterial infections, including Strep. Secondary bacterial and fungal infections can often cause severe illness and death after viral infections.
·ncbi.nlm.nih.gov·
Infection with human coronavirus NL63 enhances streptococcal adherence to epithelial cells
Long COVID after breakthrough SARS-CoV-2 infection
Long COVID after breakthrough SARS-CoV-2 infection
Researchers found that vaccination "confers only partial protection in the post-acute phase of the disease." As many as 12 percent of vaccinated people with breakthrough infections can develop Long Covid. This number could increase with waning immunity and lack of boosters.
·nature.com·
Long COVID after breakthrough SARS-CoV-2 infection
Acute and postacute sequelae associated with SARS-CoV-2 reinfection
Acute and postacute sequelae associated with SARS-CoV-2 reinfection
Researchers found that reinfection is associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality, hospitalization and a wide range of health problems. Basically, reinfections increase your risk of everything from heart and kidney problems to liver problems and diabetes.
·nature.com·
Acute and postacute sequelae associated with SARS-CoV-2 reinfection
Rising Risks with COVID Reinfection
Rising Risks with COVID Reinfection
The data show a consistent pattern of increased likelihood of hospitalization, cardiovascular effects, clotting and other blood disorders, diabetes, fatigue, gastrointestinal distress, kidney damage, mental health effects such as depression, musculoskeletal damage, neurological deficits, and pulmonary damage with each infection.
·harvardmagazine.com·
Rising Risks with COVID Reinfection
Two years of COVID-19: Excess mortality by age, region, gender, and race/ethnicity in the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic, March 1, 2020, through February 28, 2022 | medRxiv
Two years of COVID-19: Excess mortality by age, region, gender, and race/ethnicity in the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic, March 1, 2020, through February 28, 2022 | medRxiv
Researchers found that excess mortality is a better indicator of Covid-19's death toll, and that it is significantly higher than reported deaths.
·medrxiv.org·
Two years of COVID-19: Excess mortality by age, region, gender, and race/ethnicity in the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic, March 1, 2020, through February 28, 2022 | medRxiv