Neurodivergency

Neurodivergency

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Vitaly Friedman on LinkedIn: #ux #design #accessibility | 98 comments
Vitaly Friedman on LinkedIn: #ux #design #accessibility | 98 comments
💎 How To Design For Autistic People. Nearly 1% of the global population is autistic. Here’s what we need to know to design better UX ↓ ✅ Autism is a… | 98 comments on LinkedIn
·linkedin.com·
Vitaly Friedman on LinkedIn: #ux #design #accessibility | 98 comments
Understanding AuDHD
Understanding AuDHD
By Emma Hinze , Michelle Garnett and Tony Attwood AuDHD, a term describing the co-occurrence of Autism and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), has gained more attention in recent years. This article aims to provide a clear overview of AuDHD, describing both defining features and the evo
·linkedin.com·
Understanding AuDHD
Trait theory
Trait theory
In psychology, trait theory (also called dispositional theory) is an approach to the study of human personality. Trait theorists are primarily interested in the measurement of traits, which can be defined as habitual patterns of behavior, thought, and emotion.[1] According to this perspective, traits are aspects of personality that are relatively stable over time, differ across individuals (e.g. some people are outgoing whereas others are not), are relatively consistent over situations, and influence behaviour. Traits are in contrast to states, which are more transitory dispositions.
·en.wikipedia.org·
Trait theory
Autistic masking
Autistic masking
Autistic masking, also referred to as camouflaging or neurodivergent masking, is the conscious or subconscious suppression of autistic behaviors and compensation of difficulties in social interaction by autistic people with the goal of being perceived as neurotypical.[1][2] Masking is a learned coping strategy[3][4] that can be successful from the perspective of autistic people, but can also lead to adverse mental health outcomes.[1][5]
·en.wikipedia.org·
Autistic masking
Stimming
Stimming
Self-stimulatory behavior, also known as "stimming" and self-stimulation, is the repetition of physical movements, sounds, words, moving objects, or other behaviors. Such behaviors are found to some degree in all people, especially those with developmental disabilities such as ADHD, as well as autistic people. People diagnosed with sensory processing disorder are also known to potentially exhibit stimming behaviors.
·en.wikipedia.org·
Stimming
Snoezelen - Wikipedia
Snoezelen - Wikipedia
Snoezelen or controlled multisensory environment (MSE) is a therapy for people with autism and other developmental disabilities, dementia or brain injury. It consists of placing the person in a soothing and stimulating environment, called the "Snoezelen room", a form of sensory room. These rooms are specially designed to deliver stimuli to various senses, using lighting effects, color, sounds, music, scents, etc. The combination of different materials on a wall may be explored using tactile senses, and the floor may be adjusted to stimulate the sense of balance. The person is usually accompanied by an aide or therapist.
·en.wikipedia.org·
Snoezelen - Wikipedia
Frisson
Frisson
Frisson, also known as aesthetic chills or psychogenic shivers, is a psychophysiological response to rewarding stimuli that often induces a pleasurable or otherwise positively-valenced affective state and transient paresthesia, sometimes along with piloerection and mydriasis .The sensation commonly occurs as a mildly to moderately pleasurable emotional response to music with skin tingling; piloerection and pupil dilation not necessarily occurring in all cases.
·en.wikipedia.org·
Frisson
ASMR
ASMR
An autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR) is a tingling sensation that usually begins on the scalp and moves down the back of the neck and upper spine. A pleasant form of paresthesia, it has been compared with auditory-tactile synesthesia and may overlap with frisson. ASMR is a subjective experience of "low-grade euphoria" characterized by "a combination of positive feelings and a distinct static-like tingling sensation on the skin". It is most commonly triggered by specific auditory or visual stimuli, and less commonly by intentional attention control.
·en.wikipedia.org·
ASMR
The Intense World Theory – A Unifying Theory of the Neurobiology of Autism
The Intense World Theory – A Unifying Theory of the Neurobiology of Autism
Autism covers a wide spectrum of disorders for which there are many views, hypotheses and theories. Here we propose a unifying theory of autism, the Intense World Theory. The proposed neuropathology is hyper-functioning of local neural microcircuits, ...
·ncbi.nlm.nih.gov·
The Intense World Theory – A Unifying Theory of the Neurobiology of Autism
Outline of autism
Outline of autism
The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to autism:
Emotional dysregulation – mood swings, including outbursts when overwhelmed
Executive dysfunction – difficulty staying organized, initiating tasks, and/or controlling impulses
Routines – need for routine and fear of unexpected change
Sensory processing disorder – over- or under-responsiveness to sensory input
Sincerity – tendency to tell the truth
Special interests – narrow and passionate areas of interest
Stimming – repetitive movements or sounds that stimulate the senses and regulate emotion and sensory processing
Double empathy problem – a theory suggesting that the communication difficulties present in autistic individuals are due to a reciprocal lack of understanding and bidirectional differences in communication style among other factors rather than an inherent deficiency
·en.wikipedia.org·
Outline of autism
Autism spectrum
Autism spectrum
Autism, formally called autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or autism spectrum condition (ASC), is a neurodevelopmental disorder marked by deficits in reciprocal social communication and the presence of restricted and repetitive patterns of behavior. Other common signs include difficulties with social interaction, verbal and nonverbal communication, along with perseverative interests, stereotypic body movements, rigid routines, and hyper- or hyporeactivity to sensory input. Autism is clinically regarded as a spectrum disorder, meaning that it can manifest very differently in each person. For example, some are nonspeaking, while others have proficient spoken language. Because of this, there is wide variation in the support needs of people across the autism spectrum.
Pathological demand avoidance can occur. People with this set of autistic symptoms are more likely to refuse to do what is asked or expected of them, even to activities they enjoy
Unusual or atypical eating behavior occurs in about three-quarters of children with ASD, to the extent that it was formerly a diagnostic indicator.[105] Selectivity is the most common problem, although eating rituals and food refusal also occur.
Sensory abnormalities are found in over 90% of autistic people, and are considered core features by some
A 2021 anonymized online survey of 16- to 90
Rates of comorbid depression in people with an ASD range from 4–58%
Sensory processing disorder is also comorbid with ASD, with comorbidity rates of 42–88%
Gastrointestinal problems are one of the most commonly co-occurring medical conditions in autistic people.[240] These are linked to greater social impairment, irritability, language impairments, mood changes, and behavior and sleep problems.
·en.wikipedia.org·
Autism spectrum
Excoriation Disorder
Excoriation Disorder
Excoriation disorder, more commonly known as dermatillomania, is a mental disorder on the obsessive–compulsive spectrum that is characterized by the repeated urge or impulse to pick at one's own skin, to the extent that either psychological or physical damage is caused.
This automatic picking becomes habitual and is a comorbidity with ADHD.
·en.wikipedia.org·
Excoriation Disorder
Autism's Brain Structure Secrets Revealed - Neuroscience News
Autism's Brain Structure Secrets Revealed - Neuroscience News
Researchers developed a groundbreaking approach using Diffusion MRI to explore the brain structures of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).
·neurosciencenews.com·
Autism's Brain Structure Secrets Revealed - Neuroscience News
Gerrit - ADHS (@gerritadhs) on Threads
Gerrit - ADHS (@gerritadhs) on Threads
Die ist echt super. Ist von Wolfgang Wegener von www.ASS-ADHS.de über das Land Niedersachsen. ADHS hatte 2 Module, ASS 3 Module.
·threads.net·
Gerrit - ADHS (@gerritadhs) on Threads
Threads
Threads
·threads.net·
Threads
Amanda (i.am.mindblind) (@i.am.mindblind) on Threads
Amanda (i.am.mindblind) (@i.am.mindblind) on Threads
I'm Autistic with a memory disorder called SDAM (severely deficient autobiographical memory) so yeah, I have hyperfixation/special interests but my memory is terrible. Sorry yours were shadowed by...
·threads.net·
Amanda (i.am.mindblind) (@i.am.mindblind) on Threads
Martin Winkler (@dr.martin.winkler) on Threads
Martin Winkler (@dr.martin.winkler) on Threads
Noch besser : Mit inneren Bilder verknüpfen. Dann nennt sich das Emoflex und ist gerade bei ADHS sehr hilfreich (geht auch ohne Beats, dafür aber mit bilateraler Stimulation wie Tappen / Augenbewegungen)
·threads.net·
Martin Winkler (@dr.martin.winkler) on Threads
Lina (@audhs_lina) on Threads
Lina (@audhs_lina) on Threads
Elvanse 50mg - gestern Kontrolltermin bei der Psychiaterin gehabt. Es bleibt jetzt erstmal bei diesem Medikament in der Dosis. Ich habe den Eindruck, es mildert die Exekutive Dysfunktion, macht...
·threads.net·
Lina (@audhs_lina) on Threads